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Earn College Credit
in High School

TWO FOR ONE
Get both high school and college credit for the same class.

COLLEGE IS EXPENSIVE, but concurrent enrollment can help you graduate sooner, potentially saving you thousands of dollars.

A simple rule of thumb says that for every semester toward graduation (bachelor's degree) that you save through concurrent enrollment, you save $25,000 in expenses and opportunity costs of lost wages. If during your junior and senior years of high school you earn 30 university credits (the equivalent of 2 semesters on campus), you may just have saved approximately $50,000! What is even more amazing is what one year of extra retirement funding does when spread across your work lifetime. That's upwards of $100,000 in some cases!

It can be hard to think that far down the road when you’re in high school, but decisions you make now can bless you and your family in the future.

DOING WELL in concurrent enrollment classes can show college admission personnel that you're ready for college-level work.

High school students who do well in concurrent courses show university admission personnel they are prepared for college level work. Consequently, they can find it more successful to get admitted to the university of their choice. However, the reverse is also true. Students who do not perform well and get poor grades may encounter admission problems. High school students should be prepared for the rigors of university courses before they take concurrent enrollment courses.

IS THE CONCURRENT ENROLLMENT
PROGRAM RIGHT FOR YOU?

JUNIOR OR SENIOR
Applicants must be in their junior or senior year of high school and at least 16 years old to be eligible for BYU-Idaho Concurrent Enrollment.

ACADEMICALLY READY
While good grades in concurrent enrollment can help with college admissions, bad grades can hurt! Be sure you're ready for the rigors of concurrent enrollment classes.