If you are at imminent risk for self-harm please go to the Madison Memorial Emergency Room. For individuals who are at risk for harming themselves or are having a similar significant crisis, please dial 211 to access the Idaho Careline and be prepared to select Option 3. For students who are actively meeting with a BYU-Idaho counselor and are at risk for harming themselves or having a similar significant crisis, please call 208-496-HELP (208-496-4357.)

Overview

The journey through grief is different for all of us. Grief is the acute pain that accompanies loss. It is the reflection of a connection that has been lost and can feel all-consuming. Grief is not limited to the loss of people, but when it follows the loss of a loved one, it may be compounded by feelings of guilt and confusion, especially if the relationship was a difficult one. When someone important to us dies, our lives can be changed, and the accompanying grief will affect us emotionally, physically, mentally, and spiritually.

Grief is what we feel on the inside while mourning happens on the outside. Your loss and the grief that accompanies it are very personal. It is a natural reaction to the loss of a loved one. It is real because loss is real. The pain of loss can sometimes become so intense that we feel overwhelmed and begin to turn away from the very things and people that once brought peace and comfort. For this reason, it is important to seek out others who can listen and kindly offer their presence of mind and heart.

Even still, grief is a very personal experience. When you feel that your grief is interfering with your everyday life and sense of well-being, you may want to consider meeting with a counselor to serve as a guide to help you find your footing again so that you may live more forwardly, one step at a time. Consider the following words from Shakespeare as you reflect upon your loss and what to do as well as some helpful links listed below to begin the process of healing:

“Give sorrow words; the grief that does not speak knits up the o’er wrought heart and bids it break.” -Macbeth, Act 4, Scene 3

(The following resources are not created, maintained, or controlled by BYU-Idaho and are intended to serve as an educational resource. BYU-Idaho does not endorse any content that is not in keeping with university policy or doctrines and teaching of the Church.)

Additional Resources

TAO (Therapy Assistance Online)

  • Improving Your Mood / Grief and Loss (Death / Divorce / Loss of Any Kind)