Available online degrees are accredited in the United States. Degrees are not accredited in any other country and accreditation is not sought outside the U.S.

BYU-Idaho offers several more courses through their on-campus studies. This page contains information regarding BYU-Idaho's online offerings. To learn more about all the courses BYU-Idaho offers see the university catalog.

Click on a course to see details about the course on top and compare it to others.

This Course List is meant to provide students with general information regarding available online courses. For the most accurate information students should refer to the actual course scheduling information during registration each semester.

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Course Name Course Code Credits Availability Syllabus Compare Textbook Price Course Description
Survey of Accounting ACCTG180 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course is an introduction to financial and managerial accounting principles with exposure to basic accounting statements and processes and management applications. The class is intended for non-business majors and certain specialized business programs. This course does not fill any major requirements for accounting majors.
Financial Accounting ACCTG201 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
The course is intended introduce you to business entities, financial statements, and accounting for transactions within a corporate environment. You will learn and apply generally-accepted accounting principles to prepare accrual-basis financial statements for service and merchandising operations. Specific areas of focus will include accounting for: Financial Statements, Accrual Method of Accounting, Inventories, Cash and Cash Equivalents, Receivables, Fixed and Intangible Assets, Current Liabilities, Bonds, Mortgages, and other Long-term Liabilities, Shareholders? Equity, and Statement of Cash Flows. You will also learn about ethical conduct within financial accounting and internal controls of a business.
Managerial Accounting ACCTG202 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
Managerial Accounting is concerned with providing information to managers who direct and control business operations. The information is used primarily to analyze business problems, identify alternatives, and make appropriate decisions. This course is designed to introduce you to a variety of topics in managerial accounting and help you learn the mechanics of common managerial calculations; use spreadsheets to capture accounting data, analyze business problems, and develop alternative plans; make informed decisions; and communicate your analysis and decision effectively.
Accounting Software ACCTG205 2 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course takes an in-depth look at accounting software using Intuit QuickBooks Pro. Topics include invoicing, inventory control, payments, and a complete setup of a new and existing company. Only an introductory accounting knowledge is required.
Entrepreneurship in Agribusiness AGBUS105 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course introduces principles and concepts necessary in successfully participating in the agribusiness industry. The course will introduce the student to the nature of the agribusiness industry and concepts in management that will assist the student in preparing a basic business plan. Additionally, this course explores the connection of the agribusiness industry in a global setting.
Agribus Lead & Group Dynamics AGBUS138 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course addresses several aspects of creating a collateral learning experience. Students will be introduced to reflection journaling, helping the student to make a deep, personal and applied connection to the course material at hand. The student in turn will develop both writing and speaking skills to articulate complex ideas. Students will experience the power of synergy in group dynamics and skills in active listening, and group interaction. Students will also discover the power in proper delegation, planning, personal mastery, team learning, and how to create a shared vision among group members.
Intro to Int'l Agri Marketing AGBUS147 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course is an introductory course in agricultural marketing. The purpose of this course is to provide the necessary skills for future entrepreneurs and entry level managers that will enable them to analyze the international agricultural value chain and make educated and gospel centered business and marketing decisions.
Economics & Budgeting Principles AGBUS180A 2 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course introduces students to the application of microeconomic principles using basic Excel spreadsheets. Examples and assignments will be from and related to the agribusiness industry. This course is intended for students enrolled in the entry level International Agribusiness Certificate program. Students will learn how to construct and analyze enterprise budgets, simple financial statements and perform fundamental feasibility analysis by applying microeconomic principles. Agribusiness managers regularly make decisions that are more complex in price and output risks. The use of economic principles coupled with basic spreadsheet analysis assists the manager in mitigating those risks.
Cash Accounting Concepts & App AGBUS180B 2 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course is designed to provide international students, from developing economies, with a foundational understanding of general cash accounting principles as they relate to agribusinesses. Its main focus is on small business double entry accounting and basic financial statement analysis. Upon completion of this course the student should be able to understand and apply basic accounting principles, complete financial transaction analysis, utilize double-entry cash accounting methods, value non-current assets, create an income statement; statement of owner equity; balance sheet; and statement of cash flows, and complete a basic financial analysis.
Agribusiness Practicum AGBUS197R 1 Spring, Fall, Winter Materials required
An opportunity for students to leave the online classroom environment and practice the concepts of the courses in the Agribusiness Certificate through experiences in working with or for a professional operation, or a self-directed special project approved by the instructor. Students will identify a business or operation that they are interested in working with that will allow them to practice agribusiness management concepts on a day to day basis, or students may choose a self-directed special project approved by the instructor.
Intro to Cultural Anthropology ANTH 101 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course consists of anthropological approaches and perspectives on humans, their culture, and their society; basic concepts for analyzing cultural behavior.
Construction Documents ARCH 270 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course will provide in-depth information about the preparation and content of documents within a project manual. It will define and explain different types of contracts and specifications. How to write specifications will be taught and practiced during the course of the class. It will include, but not be limited to, subjects like coordinating drawings and specifications, bidding requirements, construction contracts, methods of specifying, substitutions, and warranties. This course will introduce and expose students to the legal instruments (i.e. drawings, specifications, and other documents) utilized to construct facilities and enable them to read, analyze, and interpret said documents.
Design and Color ART 107 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
In this course, students will learn the elements and principles of design and basic color theory used to solve visual design problems.
Drawing I ART 110 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course will teach students the fundamentals of theoretical and applied perspective, structural and proportional drawing, light and shade, art vocabulary, and basic composition. Note: This class is not intended for those who want to draw "for fun." It is a challenging course designed for those who plan to go into art as a career. For those who desire a recreational drawing class Art 102 "General Art 2D" is the class that would satisfy that interest.
Introduction to Graphic Design ART 130 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course covers the exploration of contemporary visual communications within graphic design and related fields.
Photography I ART 160 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
Students through classroom discussion and practical experience of the lab, will gain a foundation for black and white photography.
Typography ART 230 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course is an introduction to typography as a fundamental element of graphic design.
Graphic Design ART 235 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course involves graphic design projects with an emphasis on creative, conceptual, and practical solutions.
Information Design ART 331R 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course is an introduction to the creative and conceptual presentation of information. Emphasis will be on discovering concise, communicative, and creative methods for presenting a variety of informational formats.
Interaction Design ART 337R 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course focuses on graphic design theory and skills necessary in a digitally interactive environment. These will include information architecture, interface design, site structure, page structure, page design, typography, editorial style, graphics, and multimedia. While there will be some development with software tools, this is not a programming class. This course is designed for art majors with a graphic design emphasis..
Automotive Ownership Maintenance AUTO 125 1 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This is an online course that is required for all automotive majors, but open to students of other majors. It is designed to introduce students to some of the foundational principles and knowledge required to be successful in other automotive courses.
Electrical Systems AUTO 131 2 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course is an introduction to basic electrical principles and systems. Students will learn how to use test equipment to diagnose, and repair electrical circuit faults. They will also study batteries, starting systems, and charging systems.
Engine Performance AUTO 132 2 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course will introduce students to internal combustion engines and the systems that support them. Students will learn to perform engine condition tests and how to evaluate, diagnose, and repair issues with the fuel, ignition, cooling, and lubrication systems.
Chassis Systems AUTO 155 2 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
In this course, students will learn the theory of operation, diagnosis, service, and repair procedures of automotive chassis (steering, suspension, and braking) systems.
Drivetrains AUTO 201 2 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This is a course that focuses on theories of operation, diagnosis, repair, and maintenance of automotive drive train systems. Students will learn about and gain experience with manual transmissions/transaxles, clutch assemblies, differential axles, drive shafts/u-joints, and four wheel drive and all-wheel drive systems.
Vehicle Electronics AUTO 231 2 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
In this course, students will learn how computer controls affect the operation of the electrical systems in modern automobiles. They will learn how various sensors, actuators, and electronic control units work. They will learn about network communications between the components. Students will be able to test, diagnose, and repair the various electrical systems ranging from power windows and heated seats to instrument clusters and driver information systems.
Engine Management Systems AUTO 232 2 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
In this course, students will become familiar with how sensors, actuators, and electronic control units work together to optimize engine performance. They will learn how to use scan tools to become more proficient at testing and diagnosing faults. Students will also reinforce engine condition testing and understanding of fuel, ignition, cooling, and lubrication systems.
Business Fundamentals BA 211 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course provides an overview of the core functions of business, including product development, marketing, operations, human resource management, accounting, finance, and international business. This will be accomplished primarily by managing an on-line simulated business where students will learn to make fundamental management decisions required to effectively run a $50 million corporation. This course is designed to provide students exposure to the various career opportunities in business and also recommended for non-business students interested in gaining an overview of business management, leadership, and small business entrepreneurship.
Introduction to Biology I BIO 180 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course is the first semester of a year-long Introduction to Biology course. It includes the areas of biological chemistry, cellular structure and function, and metabolism. This course is a prerequisite for most other upper division courses in Biology. Not a General Education or Foundation Science course.
General Microbiology BIO 221 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
In this course, students will study the microorganisms (especially bacteria and viruses), their metabolism and requirements for growth, the methods used to grow and study them, the disease processes caused by them, methods used to control their growth, and the immune response to infection and disease.
Essential Human Anat & Phys BIO 230 4 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course is designed to give students an overview of human anatomy and physiology. It is a one-semester course that covers the primary structures and functions of all organ systems of the human body. It is designed for students who would like to gain a greater understanding and appreciation for the human body. It is required for students majoring in social work, health psychology, public health, health care administration, therapeutic recreation, and biology education. The course does not fulfill graduation requirements for nursing, health science, or biology majors.
Human Anatomy & Physiology I BIO 264 3 Materials required
This is the first part of a two semester course to prepare students for further study in the health and medical fields. Specifically designed for students of nursing and the allied health professions. Includes basic biochemistry, structure and function of the cell, tissues, skeleton, muscles, and nervous systems of the body. Not acceptable for biology major credit.
Human Anatomy & Physiology I Lab BIO 264L 1 Materials required
This is the laboratory accompaniment of the first part of a two-semester course studying the anatomy and physiology of the human body. While the lecture mainly focuses on physiology, most of the anatomical learning occurs in this lab. The course is designed for students of nursing and the allied health professions. Students wishing to apply to the nursing program must complete both the lecture and lab components. This course is not acceptable for biology major credit. (These students should take Bio 460 and 461 instead of 264 and 265.)
Human Anatomy & Physiology II BIO 265 3 Materials required
This is the second part of a two-semester course to prepare students for further study in the health and medical fields. Specifically designed for students of nursing and the allied health professions. Includes structure and function of the senses, circulatory, lymphatic, respiratory, urinary, digestive, endocrine and reproductive systems. Not acceptable for biology major credit.
Human Anat & Physiology II Lab BIO 265L 1 Materials required
This is the laboratory accompaniment of the second part of a two-semester course studying the anatomy and physiology of the human body. The course is designed for students of nursing and the allied health professions. Students wishing to apply to the nursing program must complete both the lecture and lab components. This course is not acceptable for biology major credit. (These students should take Bio 460 and 461 instead of 264 and 265.)
Genetics and Molecular Biology BIO 375 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course consists of an investigation of the transmission of heritable material in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Topics include classical genetics (patterns of inheritance, linkage and chromosome mapping), molecular biology (DNA structure and function, gene expression, biotechnology), and population genetics.
Pathophysiology BIO 381 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course is a study of the derangement of bodily function as seen in diseased states.
Evolutionary Science BIO 475 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
In this course, basic Darwinian evolution and the history of evolutionary thought is presented. This course includes the study of the scientific processes through which both microevolution and macroevolution occur, the history of life on earth, phylogenetics, cladistics, molecular evolution, sexual selection, population genetics, and rates of evolution.
Bus Exploration and Orientation BUS 100 1 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
Students in this course will explore business-related major and career options. Key areas of focus include: using campus resources to successfully choose and navigate academic requirements, preparing a 4-year plan for graduation, and preparing for internships and careers.
Introduction to Business BUS 101 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course is an overview of all the functions of business, including human resource management, production, marketing, accounting, finance, and international business. As an introductory course to business, many theories and principles will be touched upon. Students will also learn some important life skills, develop teamwork, and gain valuable exposure to the various career opportunities in business.
Intro. to Entrepreneurship BUS 110 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course offers an introduction on how to develop a clear vision of what matters most to students as they begin their entrepreneurial journey. The course will also deliver practical life lessons and fundamental business tools required to become a successful entrepreneur. Students will develop some important mindsets in the area of thinking, learning and doing what the financially successful entrepreneurs do.
Business Applications BUS 115 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
Students will acquire, develop and apply intermediate spreadsheet analysis skills in a business context as well as demonstrate basic database use. After individually completing spreadsheet tutorials and assignments, students will then develop and apply their skills in business projects and exams. The projects and exams, which are designed to be realistic and representative of business activities students might encounter in the workplace.
Office Procedures BUS 129 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
In this course, students will develop and apply functional office skills in time management, interpersonal communications, records management, teamwork, and customer service. Students also learn how to plan meetings, take minutes, and use critical decision-making skills to identify and solve problems.
The Cycle of Cash BUS 180 2 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
The Cycle of Cash course provides the financial tools, skills, and judgment students need to read financial statements and make correct financial decisions for a small business or new venture. This course will also review what it takes to start, acquire or sell a small business.
Small Business Creation BUS 210 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course is designed to introduce students to the basics of small business creation, understand the importance of creating systems, and expose students to the many career opportunities available in the field of entrepreneurship. Students will learn about startups, buying existing businesses, franchises, and family run businesses. Through class discussions, entrepreneur cases, guest entrepreneurs, selected readings, and team projects, students will gain a clear understanding of entrepreneur opportunities. Each student will participate in actually starting a microbusiness during the semester, drafting a one page business plan on their own big idea and networking with entrepreneur mentors to support their entrepreneur idea.
Word Processing I BUS 240 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
BUS 240 will provide a thorough understanding of word processing tools and enhance efficiency, effectiveness, and professionalism in users and documents. Topics include navigation and format of business documents, graphics, tables, charts, and styles.
Human Resource Management BUS 270 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course is an overview of human resource management topics such as diversity, EEOC laws, recruiting, training, performance management, compensation and benefits, motivation, workplace organizational design, difficult interactions, employee relations, and safety. The course also considers organizational behavior topics in the context of human resource management such as teamwork, power dynamics, innovation, and groupthink. The course leverages case studies and professional/scholarly articles to gain a better understanding of real-life workplace challenges.
Beginning Internship BUS 298R 3 Fall, Winter, Spring Materials required
Internships are exempt from tuition, but are charged this independent course fee. Students must be registered for this course within the first two weeks of the semester they are completing the internship. For more information on how to register for an internship see the Management homepage. This course is designed for students working full or part-time in business-related employment to gain introductory experience and understanding of the functions of a successful company. Students must complete application and approval through the College of Business and Communication Career Services, contract with their employer to work for college credits, and work a minimum of 15 hours per week for a minimum of seven weeks. Other requirements include writing reports, submitting self- and supervisor evaluations, and adhering to BYU-Idaho standards and policies.
Adv Writing in Pro Contexts BUS 301 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
Introduces the fundamentals of rhetorical principles and writing practices using a number of typical business situations. During the course, students will produce effective business letters, memos, reports, and employment packages -- some of which will be created independently and some of which will involve collaborative efforts. This will prepare students for the demands of business careers that require significant time reading, drafting, and revising written communication.
Launching New Ventures BUS 310 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
Ideally, a student will have completed BUS 210 before moving on to BUS 310. This course is designed as an introduction to the process of perceiving an opportunity and creating an organization to pursue it. Working alone and in teams students will learn to plan, finance, launch, manage, and harvest a new venture. In order to integrate ideas across departments and colleges, this course will be open to students in engineering, computer science, and business management. All students who desire to lead a business plan team will have an opportunity to describe their ventures in the early class sessions to facilitate team member recruiting. Class discussion, readings, lectures, and projects are learning tools. A student's project is developed throughout this course and involves completing a new venture plan and financial forecast. Each team business plan also becomes a live case for the purposes of class discussion.
Organizational Leadership BUS 321 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course incorporates Organizational Effectiveness at three levels: individual, group, and organizations. Students will examine these areas: motivation, team, group behavior, organizational design, structure, culture, communication, leadership, decision making, and managing change
Social Innovation BUS 374 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
Intended to help students become better disciple leaders by ?Doing Good, Better.? Learn how to become a change maker and embrace some element of the social spectrum -- anything from working for a non-profit to starting a hybrid or social business. Covers the broad spectrum of how individuals and organizations are solving the world'?s greatest problems in new and innovative ways. Understand the different ways to make a difference in the word when the opportunity presents itself to give back. Learn about the broad spectrum of social innovation including: non profits, social businesses, NGO's, impact investing, philanthropy, and corporate social responsibility. Hybrid class; all course content will be completed outside of class.
Business Law BUS 375 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course is an introduction to legal environment in which businesses operate as well as an overview of laws impacting business. Topics include understanding the legal system, contracts, ethics, intellectual property, antitrust, employment, business organizations, and securities.
International Business BUS 380 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course is an overview of international business designed to provide a global perspective on international trade and direct investment. Reviews international cultural, political, legal and economic environments and their effect on marketing, production, and human resource management strategy.
Advanced Business Internship BUS 398R 3 Spring, Fall, Winter Materials required
Internships are exempt from tuition, but are charged this independent course fee. Required for all Business Management students. Students must be registered for this course within the first two weeks of the semester they are completing the internship. For more information on how to register for an internship see the Business Management home page. Students will find a professional business management internship in an approved business, complete the application and obtain approval through the College of Business and Communication Career Services, be enrolled in the course, write reports, submit evaluations, and complete at least 270 hours of work in seven weeks or more. During their internship students will gain a greater vision of becoming a business professional and establish career networking links. Students will earn three credits and may receive compensation from the employer and letters of recommendation from both the employer and BYU-Idaho.
Special Projects BUS 399R 3 Spring, Fall, Winter Materials required
An arranged research or special project course. Contact the department for registration information.
Entrepreneurial Management BUS 410 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course is as much about becoming as it is about knowing and doing. It is well suited for those who desire to pursue entrepreneurship at some point in their lives, but it is equally valuable for students who want to gain a broad perspective of business management and leadership principles. Through a series of case studies and other activities, students will experience many of the challenges faced by entrepreneurs every day--deciding whether or not a new venture is a good idea, how to pursue the venture, and how to navigate the murky waters of financing, negotiating with partners, investors and suppliers. Students will develop critical thinking and analytical skills, as well as some essential quantitative skills.
Principles of Business Strategy BUS 499 3 Winter 2022 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course is a business strategy capstone experience focusing on theory of strategy and problem solving using the case method and projects. Students form cross-disciplinary teams to participate in an online business simulation and to provide consulting services to local businesses. Consulting services require attendance at regular meetings outside of class during business hours for both online and on-campus students. In this course there will be an emphasis on problem-framing, analysis, and strategic recommendations, both quantitative and qualitative.
Introductory Chemistry CHEM 101 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
An introductory course that covers fundamental concepts of chemistry for students preparing for studies in nursing, paramedicine, agriculture, biology, exercise physiology, health science, and other disciplines that require a one semester introduction to chemistry.
Introductory Chemistry Lab CHEM 101L 1 Materials required
This course is an online introduction to chemistry lab that illustrates principles of chemistry and laboratory techniques. Participation in the course requires reading pre-lab materials, completion of a pre-lab quiz, watching videos demonstrating laboratory procedures, recording data and observations in electronic format, and completing a post-lab quiz.
Child Development CHILD210 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course is a theoretical, academically oriented course focusing on the physical, cognitive, emotional, and social development of the child from conception through adolescence. Students will explore the influences of family, peers, and social institutions on the child's development.
Infant and Toddler Development CHILD300 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course involves an in-depth study of the child from conception to three years of age. Students will become familiar with various theoretical perspectives in each of the developmental domains of infancy and toddlerhood. They will discuss ethical and developmental issues arising because of technological advancement and investigate infant/toddler temperament, personality, and social/emotional development. Students will also explore the influence of mothers and fathers, and the parenting and teaching techniques that are most appropriate for infants and toddlers.
Early/Middle Child Development CHILD310 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course is designed to help students gain deeper knowledge of developmental science ? understanding of children?s development in the physical, cognitive, and emotional/social domains, developmental theory, and core developmental concepts during early and middle childhood - and to increase students? disposition to apply developmental science knowledge to plan and implement effective interventions to foster optimum development of children they will serve in their roles as professionals, parents and in church and community settings.
Adolescent Development CHILD320 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
In this course the adolescent experience will be examined within a developmental and social context, with emphasis on the importance of the family. Other contexts to be considered include peers, religion, community, schools, and broader cultural systems.
Parent Education CHILD330 2 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
The purpose of this course is to prepare students to teach parent education classes. It explores a variety of parent education programs and encourages students to think carefully and critically about parenting materials.
Introduction to Excel CIT 110 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course is an introduction to the use of spreadsheets in business. Emphasis is on learning spreadsheet literacy concepts and a popular spreadsheet application to solve business problems.
Introduction to Databases CIT 111 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course covers the basic elements of database management systems. It introduces students to the concepts of logical and physical relationships in a data model and the concepts of inner and outer joins. Students will use a computer aided software engineering (CASE) tool to design, create, and query a database.
Intro to Linux CIT 112 2 Winter 2022 Materials required
This course describes the Linux operating system and exposes the student to the most common distributions of Linux. This course teaches the student how to login and explore before explaining the file system, manipulating files, and how to use the Linux Command Line Interface (CLI) or shell. The course also teaches the student how to work with archiving, compression, text processing, regular expressions, and shell scripting.
Introduction to Programming CIT 160 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course is an introduction to the basic concepts of computers and information technology. Students will learn the basics of computer hardware and the binary and hexadecimal number systems, design algorithms to solve simple computing problems, and will write computer programs using Boolean logic, control structures, and functions.
Introduction to Cybersecurity CIT 171 2 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
Introduction to Cybersecurity provides students with a fundamental understanding of information security. The course begins with the fundamental concepts of confidentiality, integrity, and availability, and applies these to many social and computing situations, including legal issues, risk management, social engineering, security awareness, etc. Introduction to Cybersecurity covers a broad spectrum of security topics, but this course focuses on how individuals can protect their own information assets. NOTE: For those students who have experience with cyber security and networking, the CIT 270 Systems Security I is the recommended starting point for computer- and data-related majors. For those without prior experience with cyber security and networking, CIT 171 Introduction to Cyber Security course is recommended.
Database Design & Development CIT 225 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
Includes concepts and principles of database theory, application, and management technologies: logical and physical database design and implementation; use of UML semantic to describe Entity Relationship Designs (ERDs) and SQL to implement relationships between entities; SQL is used to query and transact against a sample database. This course has a reputation for being very challenging. Some tips for success include the following: Class lectures assume you have done the reading. You should also read lab assignments before coming to the lab each week. The instructor provides a few minutes during the beginning of class to answer questions on course content and material. It is the student's responsibility to review the material, prepare and ask questions. Class administration will be covered at the beginning of each meeting. If you are late, it is your responsibility to get the information from a classmate or visit the instructor's office during posted office hours or by arrangement. The class makes extensive use of the written materials and benefit greatly from the assigned and optional textbooks. You can access the web pages from iLearn or directly from the Internet. ADVISING NOTE: For students with no prior database experience or knowledge, the CIT 111 Introduction to Databases course is recommended. For those with some prior experience with databases and database theory, this course can be the appropriate starting point for computer- and data-related majors.
Networking CIT 240 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course teaches general networking principles to provide an understanding of data communication protocols, transmission systems, media, and software.
Network Design I CIT 241 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course teaches the principles of network standards and architectures that correspond to the Interconnecting Cisco Networking Devices Part 2 (ICND2) standard. Students will learn the configuration and use of networking devices and protocols including LAN switching technologies, IPv4 and IPv6 routing technologies, WAN technologies, infrastructure services, and infrastructure maintenance.
Object Oriented Programming CIT 260 3 Materials required
This course is an introduction to object oriented programming using the Java programming language. Students will write computer programs using primitive data types, control structures, Java Swing classes, and objects. Students will read and draw UML class diagrams and will use Java swing to write programs with a graphical user interface.
IT Management and DevOps CIT 262 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course teaches the concepts of systems analysis and design for those desiring to work in the field of information technology. Initially, an overview of an information system and the software development life cycle (SDLC) processes are covered. Students will gain an in depth, real experience through examining the DevOps culture that supports iterative development practices. NOTE: One of the following courses (CSE 110, CIT 160, CS 124, WDD 130) or basic knowledge of programming and development best practices is encouraged prior to taking this course.
Systems Security I CIT 270 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
The purpose of this course is to provide the student with an overview of the field of Cyber Security. Students will be exposed to the spectrum of Security activities, methods, methodologies, and procedures. This course offers a comprehensive guide for anyone wishing to take the CompTIA Security+ Certification Exam. It provides an introduction to the fundamentals of network security, including compliance and operational security; threats and vulnerabilities; application, data, and host security; access control and identity management; and cryptography. The course covers new topics in network security as well, including web application attacks, penetration testing, data loss prevention, cloud computing security and application programming development security. NOTE: For those students who have no prior experience with Cyber Security, the CIT 171 Introduction to Cyber Security course is recommended. For those with some prior experience with Cyber Security, this course can be the appropriate starting point for computer- and data-related majors.
Practicum CIT 295 1 Winter 2022 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
The purpose of CIT Practicum at BYU-Idaho is to actively pursue the mission of BYU-Idaho ? ?develop disciples of Jesus Christ? (University Mission Statement) ? and service plays an important role in this process. Students will seek to put into practice (e.g. Practicum) the skills and knowledge gained through their initial course of study in the CIT program (e.g. 100 and 200 level courses). Students are asked to find and engage in volunteer service that focuses on benefiting others. Please be aware that service work is considered outward facing. As the sponsoring organization for this course, the service provided should not benefit BYU-Idaho as this detracts from the service orientation. Also the service should not benefit BYU-Idaho when a comparable paid job exists (e.g. TA, web designer, programmer, tech support, student support, market researcher, SOC analyst, tutor, etc.) as it could potentially create a violation of the Fair Labor Standards Act.
Database Programming CIT 325 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course teaches the concepts of database programming. It teaches how to write stored functions and procedures inside the database, how to use collections, how to use embedded objects, how to use transaction control mechanics, how to import large comma separated files, and large text files into a database. It explores the uses of the database as a data repository for web-based applications.
Database Administration CIT 326 3 Winter 2022 Materials required
This course defines the theory and practice of how to manage a commercial relational database management system. Students will learn how to install, configure, and create databases; transact with data; and create operational plans that maintain, backup, and recover database instances.
Data Warehousing CIT 327 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course defines the theory and practice of data analysis. The course will compare and contrast the operational and analytical database models. Students will learn how to define, implement, and query a database warehouse by leveraging sample data warehouses built from Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) and Customer Resource Management (CRM) solutions.
Operating Systems I CIT 352 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course provides a fundamental understanding of computer operating systems focusing on Linux.
Operating Systems II CIT 353 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course provides students with the administration skills to plan, install/configure, manage, and troubleshoot a Windows Server Environment.
Object Oriented Development CIT 360 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
Students in this course use object-oriented concepts and technologies to develop client-server applications. These client-server applications will use technologies such as Java, servlets, Android, Android Room, Firebase Real-time Database, Hibernate, and JSON.
Advanced Scripting CIT 361 3 Fall 2021 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
Systems programming, automation and configuration using advanced scripting techniques.
.NET Software Development CIT 365 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course leverages a student's fundamental software development and core web technology background with the Microsoft.NET framework with C# using the Visual Studio Integrated Development Environment.Students will build upon a C# foundation using the ASP.NET framework to design and develop scalable, standards-based web sites, applications, and services using contemporary methodologies and established design patterns.Team work and programming deliverables will be required.
Project Management CIT 380 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course introduces concepts, issues, approaches, tools, techniques, and technologies applicable to the management of projects. Projects can be defined as any temporary endeavor undertaken to create unique product, service, or result. The course explores how a manager can plan, organize, implement and control non-routine activities to achieve cost, schedule and performance objectives.
Business Intel and Analytics CIT 381 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course provides an introduction to Business Intelligence, including the processes, methodologies, infrastructure, and current practices used to transform business data into useful information and support business decision-making and strategy. Business Intelligence requires foundational knowledge in data storage and retrieval, thus this course will review logical data models for both database management systems and data warehouses. Students will learn to extract and manipulate data from these systems and assess security-related issues. Data mining, visualization, and statistical analysis along with reporting options such as management dashboards are addressed. This course also provides an introduction to Analytics, or the automation of analysis, including an overview of qualitative and quantitative analysis methods and methods used to automate these processes for speed, interactivity, and quality (reliability and validity). Several examples of modern types of analytics will be introduced and explored such as descriptive, diagnostic, discovery, predictive, and prescriptive approaches. Each semester we seek out opportunities to work with real world companies, organizations on campus, or public data to examine how they and/or we can more effectively leverage existing data and how to redesign their data flows to set up improved data analysis.
Senior Project CIT 490 3 Fall, Winter, Spring Materials required
This course allows each student to design, build, and implement a project of their own choosing to further individual learning and career goals. Students will identify an area of interest and propose a project plan to pursue those goals through analysis, design, development, testing and implementation in order to complete the project. Students may also pursue and complete a professional-level, industry-recognized certification. Students will work with the faculty and mentors from industry for support in achieving project objectives. Students may work individually or within teams, but are required to account for personal contributions and growth. Each student must write and submit a project plan, and the plan must be approved by the instructor prior to registration.Contact the instructor for proposal development directions.
Senior Practicum CIT 495 1 Spring, Fall, Winter Materials required
This is a capstone experience for the Computer Information Technology major. There are two options available: A research paper on a relevant Information Technology topic or participate in service learning. The purpose of this course is to build on the knowledge that students have learned in the Computer Information Technology major.
Internship CIT 498 3 Spring, Fall, Winter Materials required
This course is designed to be a capstone experience where a student applies the skills they have learned in information systems in a real world environment. Internships are exempt from tuition, but are charged this independent course fee.
Hardware Technician CITBC102 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course explores the fundamental components and concepts around computing devices, including hardware components, networking devices, memory, bootup issues, Operating System components, storage, wireless connectivity, security and troubleshooting exercises. Successful completion of the course will prepare the student to sit for the PC Pro certification exam as well as the CompTIA A+ certification exam. This is an LDSBC course offered in partnership with BYU-Idaho.
Windows Client CITBC125 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course focuses on installing, configuring and administering Windows Desktop systems across peer-to-peer configurations as well as client-server domain environments. Develops the skills required to be a consultant, full-time desktop support technician, or IT generalist who administers Windows-based computers and devices as a portion of their broader technical responsibilities. Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be prepared to sit for the Client Pro certification exam. This is an LDSBC course offered in partnership with BYU-Idaho.
Introduction to Networking CITBC150 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course introduces basic networking concepts including the OSI Model, TCP/IP, networking services and an exploration of Wide Area Networks. Explores network security concepts including authentication, authorization, and security layers. The course includes labs and assignments that require the student to demonstrate how to design networks and configure the different services correctly. The successful completion of this course will prepare the student to sit for the Network Pro certification as well as the CompTIA Network+ certification. This is an LDSBC course offered in partnership with BYU-Idaho.
Public Speaking COMM 102 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course is an exploration of the fundamental principles and practices of effective informative and persuasive speeches. This course examines basic elements of public speaking including increasing speaker confidence, ethics of speaking, audience analysis and adaptation, appropriate methods of delivery, researching supporting materials, effective use of presentational aids, and effective outlining and delivery of speeches.
Writing for Communication Career COMM 111 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
Course Fees: $20.00 (not applicable to online sections) This course builds basic writing competence and other skills needed for today's media and communication careers.
Visual Media COMM 130 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
Students will gain skills in visual communication as they learn, analyze and apply principles of design, typography, color, and photography to create various design projects. These skills enhance all types of business, education, church, community, and personal pursuits.
Mass Media and Society COMM 140 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course surveys historical and contemporary mass media and examines their current situation and trends, with particular emphasis on concurrent impacts between the media and society. Principal media theory is also explored.
Interpersonal Theory & Practice COMM 150 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course examines basic elements and theory of human communication in a practical, relevant setting. Students will explore varied facets of interpersonal process with emphasis on improving communication skills and interpersonal relationships.
Communication Essentials COMM 175 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
For Non-Communication majors, this course helps give a basic foundation in interpersonal communication and public speaking skills and principles. Through a combination of exercises and class discussions, students develop the tools to continually work toward more effective communication.
Organizational Principles COMM 250 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course is an analysis of communication principles and practices in organizations from a theoretical perspective. Students will review career opportunities in the field after learning methods to improve communication practices.
Professional Presentations COMM 273 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course explores key principles and skills that will facilitate a student's move from competency in presentations to excellence in professional presentations. This course will emphasize audience-centered strategies in the planning, creating, slide design, and delivery of a variety of realistic presentations in a range of professional environments, including conference room, lecture hall, and local business settings.
Comm Research Fundamentals COMM 280 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course is an exploration of the methodological and mathematical tools and principles used in evaluating, designing, and executing communication and media research. A variety of projects and assignments will explore the fundamentals of research such as sampling, research design, appropriate statistical tests, focus groups, surveys, polls, and appropriate use of secondary research sources. Additionally, students will develop proficiency in data collection and analysis tools of Microsoft Excel.
Communication Career Workshop COMM 289 1 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course will provide students with information on internships and careers within their chosen field. Students will learn how to position themselves and successfully apply for these opportunities. Students will attend campus career events and workshops to help them develop a resume, portfolio, and professional network database that will aid them in their post-graduation objectives, as well as learn about professional expectations and conduct.
Communication Practicum I COMM 297R 1 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course gives students experience in the various aspects and fields of professional communication by applying principles learned in their coursework to outside-of-class projects and work environments. Projects are primarily self-directed with minimal supervision, and students do not meet collectively as a class on a regular basis. Note: Communication majors may take any combination of 297R, 397R and 497R practicum courses in any sequence to fulfill their graduation requirements.
Ethics and Legal Issues COMM 307 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course requires students to recognize and practice legal reasoning in relation to issues of relevance to communication professionals. Students will learn to identify elements present in cases concerning libel, privacy, and intellectual property. Additionally, students will consider the legal constraints associated with commercial expression. Finally, students will explore ethical questions likely to arise within the field of professional communication, which cannot be adequately answered by legal means. Students will develop strategies for answering those questions and learn to apply relevant ethical principles as they do so.
Creating Online Media COMM 310 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course is a technical introduction to search-engine optimization and standards-based web design and production. Students will train in semantic HTML markup, CSS-based design and dynamic PHP scripting, overview of the history, current status, and future possibilities of HTML.
Design for Social Media COMM 315 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course will teach students to strategically decide how best to visually communicate an engaging integrated message across the appropriate social media channels to reach the intended audience. Students will be introduced to and create a variety of solutions to clearly communicate visual online messages.
Group Dynamics COMM 350 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
Course Fees: $30.00 This course analyzes the theory and practice of human communication in a small-group setting focusing on leadership, participation, and evaluation, with emphasis in group norms, roles, cohesion, and conflict.
Conflict Mgmt and Negotiation COMM 450 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course will teach students the theory needed to gain a hands-on experience to manage conflicts while using principled negotiation in a variety of personal and professional contexts. Topics in this course include conflict management strategies, negotiation, third-party intervention, and relevant strategies for effective leadership in the workplace, in interpersonal relationships, and with families.
WordPress Practicum COMM 497A 1 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course is a specialized practicum that trains students in the software WordPress. It includes regular instruction, class times and assignments.
Construction Safety CONST221 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
Students will learn how employee safety is critical to the successful completion of any construction project. This course introduces students to OSHA policies, procedures, and standards, as well as construction safety and health principles. Special emphasis will be placed on recognizing the most common safety hazards in the construction industry.
Construction Estimating CONST285 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to the principles of construction cost estimates, including organizing and planning an estimate, developing material and labor databases, preparing accurate quantity takeoffs, and developing an understanding of overhead and profit.
Field Scheduling CONST291 3 Winter 2022 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
In this course, students will be introduced to the concepts of construction planning and scheduling.
Project Management CONST380 2 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
Students in this course learn the objectives that define a successful project using varying delivery methods in commercial building construction. Students will learn how to use the tools the project manager uses to successfully manage the construction of a building project.
Construction Scheduling CONST391 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
Students in this course learn the styles and techniques of creating a construction schedule by breaking down the project scope and developing schedule activities, durations, and a network of logical relationships to calculate projected start and finish dates.
Intro to Software Development CS 124 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course is the first step in the computer science and software engineering major tract. The goal of this course is that each student will be able to solve problems in Cplusplus and have a solid foundation in software development methodology.
Agile Project Management CS 160 3 Winter 2022 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
Object-Oriented Software Develop CS 165 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
Software design and development using the object-oriented paradigm, algorithm formulation and object-oriented programming
Web Engineering I CS 213 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
Internet and web basics, web fundamentals, web browsers, web servers, and web terminology. This course teaches the concepts behind the fundamental tools used for building client-side web applications. It emphasizes client side programming standards and programming tools used to create dynamic web applications.
Designing Data Structures CS 235 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
Students will learn how to build software to meet right specifications, optimize on performance, and deepen our understanding of data structures.
Survey Obj Ort Prog/Data Struct CS 241 4 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course provides an introduction to object-oriented programming and common data structures for those not requiring the depth of CS 165 and CS 235.
Software Design and Development CS 246 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
Advanced object-oriented designs and software development.
Technical Communication CS 308 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
Technical writing and presentation to technical audiences; professional communication including resumes' and job interview; collaboration
Operating Systems CS 345 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
Analysis of methods used by operating systems to perform typical system services, including: process control, memory management, scheduling, I/O, file management, concurrency, and parallelism
Software Engineering I CS 364 4 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
Software engineering overview: software requirements engineering including elicitation and specification; software design
Software Engineering II CS 416 2 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
There are two parts of CS 416: software quality engineering and software cost estimation. The first part relates to testing, verification, and validation. The second relates to estimating the cost of developing software.
Software Engineering III CS 432 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
There are two parts of CS 432: software development models and project management. The first part relates to the software process, software life cycles, and processes used to guide the development of software systems. The second relates to how to work with the human members of the team.
Introduction to Computing CSE 100 1 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This is an introductory class into the fields of computer science, software engineering, computer programming, and software development. It is designed to introduce the student to the world of computers and software, and particularly how we use computers and software to build life changing solutions in areas like mobile and web applications, databases, and artificial intelligence. It is also designed to clarify the curriculum at BYU-Idaho so a student can successfully plan a graduation path and educational experience.
Programming Building Blocks CSE 110 2 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course will introduce students to programming. It will introduce the building blocks of programming languages (variables, decisions, calculations, loops, array, and input/output) and use them to solve problems.
Programming with Functions CSE 111 2 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course will introduce students to programming with functions. This will include functions, parameters, scope, and return values. A great emphasis will be spent on working with larger codebases and producing useful applications.
Clojure Language CSE 121A 1 Fall 2021 Materials required
This course introduces students to using Clojure to solve discipline specific problems.
JavaScript Language CSE 121B 1 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course introduces students to using JavaScript to solve discipline specific problems.
C Language CSE 121C 1 Fall 2021 Materials required
This course introduces students to using C to solve discipline specific problems.
Algorithm Design CSE 130 2 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course will focus on designing and debugging algorithms within a single function. An emphasis will be placed on problem solving and analysis skills.
Modularization Design CSE 131 2 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This class will focus on designing and debugging programs that consist of multiple functions. An emphasis will be placed on problem solving and analysis skills.
Data Intuition and Insight CSE 150 2 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course introduces students to how data is used to make decisions and communicate meaning through visualization. We will also learn the underlying data summaries used in data visualizations (mean, standard deviation, percentiles).
Technical Teamwork CSE 170 2 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
Technical teamwork will give students a foundation on how to effectively function in a technical team. This includes an introduction to different types of technical teams, roles individuals play in these teams, and processes that are commonly employed.
Programming with Classes CSE 210 2 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course will introduce the notion of classes and objects. It will present encapsulation at a conceptual level. It will also work with inheritance and polymorphism.
Programming with Data Structures CSE 212 2 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course will introduce students to the common programming data structures with an emphasis on how to use them to solve practical, real-world problems.
C++ Language CSE 220C 1 Winter 2022 Materials required
This course introduces students to using C++ to solve discipline specific problems.
Encapsulation Design CSE 230 2 Winter 2022 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This class will focus on designing and debugging classes. An emphasis will be placed on problem solving and analysis skills.
Inheritance Design CSE 231 2 Fall 2022 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This class will focus on designing and debugging programs with related classes using inheritance and polymorphism. An emphasis will be placed on problem solving and analysis skills.
Data Science Programming CSE 250 2 Fall 2021 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course builds on the general programming principles of the pre-requisite course and teaches students how to write programs in the context of data science applications. It focuses on leveraging preexisting libraries to accomplish data retrieval, preparation, prediction, and analysis tasks.
Software Testing CSE 270 3 Spring 2022 Materials required
Explore Testing in relation to S/W Development, Business, Career, System Architecture, Quality, and Security. Appraising different tools (manual to automation), process, and techniques. Create Test Plans & Processes scaling from unit to system.
Software Lifecycle Models CSE 272 2 Winter 2022 Materials required
Software Lifecycle Models describes many ways in which software development teams can be organized, how artifacts are generated and utilized, how communication between team members occurs, and how progress is tracked.
Applied Programming CSE 310 4 Fall 2021 Materials required
This course will teach students to work in teams on large projects using new technology on self-defined projects. The class will simulate real-word programming projects with the aim of producing workable solutions that have potential impact.
Design Patterns CSE 331 2 Winter 2022 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This class will focus on understanding and using design patterns as high-level programming constructs. An emphasis will be placed on problem solving and analysis skills.
Web Backend Development I CSE 340 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This programming course focuses on constructing dynamic web sites using server-side languages, making use of databases and design patterns. The concepts introduced in Web Frontend Development courses are expected to be continued and implemented.
Web Backend Development II CSE 341 3 Winter 2022 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course focuses on the backend development of dynamic, service-oriented web applications. Students will learn how to design and implement web services, how to interact with data storage, and how to use these tools to build functioning web application.
Requirements Elicitation CSE 372 2 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
Finding the needs of a stakeholder is a non-trivial process. One cannot simply ask them what they need; they often do not know or know how to describe their needs. Requirements engineering is the process of systematically interviewing and observing clients to discover their needs. It also consists of expressing these needs in a non-ambiguous way. CSE 271 takes students through every step of this process.
Internship CSE 398 4 Spring, Fall, Winter Materials required
An Academic Internship is a planned and supervised practical experience in a vocational setting. Interns acquire practical skills while applying classroom theory and principles.
Architectural Design CSE 430 2 Winter 2022 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This class enables students to work in very large codebases, describing existing designs and suggesting improvements.
Machine Learning and Data Mining CSE 450 3 Fall 2022 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course is an introduction to the process of using machine learning to mine knowledge and patterns from data. Students will be introduced to several different algorithms spanning both supervised and unsupervised learning, and learn how to appropriately apply them in data mining. This course will examine methods that have emerged and proven to be of value in recognizing patterns and making predictions from an applications perspective. This course will survey applications and provide an opportunity for hands-on experimentation with algorithms for data mining using easy-to-use software and cases.
Computer Security CSE 453 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
The purpose of this class is to help each student develop the skills necessary to become a security expert in whatever domain of computer security that is important to their job when they enter the workforce.
User Interface Eval & Design CSE 471 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course focuses on the methods in which we can communicate often complex technical concepts to people in an intuitive and non-intimidating manner, while being able to interpret input from people from a human-centric perspective. This is essentially a communication class.
Senior Project CSE 499 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
An Academic Internship is a planned and supervised practical experience in a vocational or educational setting. Interns acquire practical skills while applying classroom theory and principles.
Senior Project, Part A CSE 499A 2 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
In this course students will gain experience with directed individual or group research and study of a topic in computer science not covered by the curriculum. Part A of the senior project includes proposal preparation, research, requirements specification, and other activities as specified in the proposal.
Senior Project, Part B CSE 499B 1 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course is the completion of the senior project started in CS 499A as specified in the proposal and requirements specification.
Introduction to Programming (ENSIGN COLLEGE) CSPC 105 3 Fall 2021 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
Intro to Dance Major and Profs DANCE103 1 Winter 2022 Materials required
This course is designed to help potential dance majors or minors explore career opportunities in dance during their freshman year.
Senior Capstone Project DANCE403 2 Winter 2022 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
Computer Systems ECEN 106 2 Fall 2021 Materials required
ECEN 106, Computer Systems will show you how computers work, from charge on a computer chip to pixels on your device and everything in between. This class will give a high-level overview of all these parts with the goal of giving you a conceptual understanding of how everything fits together without getting bogged down in details.
Fundamentals of Digital Systems ECEN 160 3 DISCONTINUED after Spring 2021 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course explores the fundamentals of digital systems including: number systems, truth tables, Boolean algebra, Karnaugh maps, combinational logic circuits (SSI, MSI and programmable circuits), sequential logic circuits (flip-flops, counters, and shift registers), and state machine design and analysis. Students must design and build a project that uses sequential logic and a digital simulation tool. A student presentation is required.
Econ Principles & Problems Micro ECON 150 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This introductory course in microeconomics studies the behavior of individual economic agents such as consumers and businesses in a market economy. Analytical tools are used to study the consumption and production decisions in an economy under perfect and imperfect market conditions.
Econ Principles & Problems-Macro ECON 151 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This introductory course in macroeconomics studies the national economy as a whole and its interaction with the global economy. Measurement of economic health and the use of fiscal and monetary policies to address unemployment, inflation, and growth are analyzed.
Health Economics ECON 365 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course introduces economic tools necessary to analyze the health care industry sectors, such as the Medical Care Markets, the Insurance Markets, the Physicians Services Market, the Hospital Services Markets and the Market for Pharmaceuticals. Additionally, this course explores the effects of policies and reforms in health care in the United States.
Teaching as a Profession ED 200 2 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course, a cornerstone of the Educational Core for all teacher preparation programs, is designed to assist future teachers develop a personal educational philosophy through broadened perspectives and enlightened discernment. Included is a thoughtful study of gospel-themed teaching principles, educational philosophies and theories, current educational research, and relevant historical events and perspectives. Learning activities will lead the serious teacher candidate through a creative process culminating in an individual articulation of a personal philosophy statement. Although the course focuses on the preparation and development of professional teachers, we view teaching and learning as eternal principles with application in ourselves, homes, church, and classrooms. All are encouraged to increase in wisdom and follow the Savior as we strive to become master teachers.
Early Field Practicum ED 245 2 Fall 2021 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
Ed Psych & Human Development ED 304 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
Relying heavily on social science, cognitive neuroscience, and the study of Christ as a master teacher, this course is designed to explore child and adolescent development, to identify principles that promote understanding and guide the creation and implementation of purposeful and meaningful learning experiences, and to identify teaching strategies that promote thoughtfulness in both the effective and cognitive domains.
Culture and Diversity ED 312 2 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
Idaho Comprehensive Literacy #1 ED 344 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This is the first in a series of courses to prepare future teachers to guide children to the successful acquisition of reading, spelling and writing skills. The course develops a professional level knowledge of English language structures, the sequence of literacy development in children, best teaching practices, strategies to support English Language Learners, 21st Century Literacies including Digital Literacy, and assessment and intervention strategies. Specifically, this course addresses the early developmental stages of print awareness, phonological awareness, and decoding.
Principles of Teaching & Assess ED 361 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
The teacher candidate will learn and practice the principles of teaching used by successful educators that have been identified in the Danielson Framework for Teaching. These principles include lesson planning, the development of a supportive classroom culture, and the use of formative/summative assessment, evidence-based teaching methods, classroom management, and instructional technology to engage students in learning.
Content Area Reading & Writing ED 461 3 Winter 2022 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course will prepare future secondary teachers with principles, tools and strategies to foster literacy in every content area. This course meets the Idaho State requirements for literacy for educators teaching at a secondary level.
Basic Writing ENG 106 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course emphasizes basic writing conventions: effective sentences, paragraphs, and short essays. Recommended for individuals with ACT English score of 17 or below.
College Reading ENG 107 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
In this elective course students will develop and apply reading skills for improved textbook comprehension in the arts and sciences.
Writing & Reasoning Foundations ENG 150 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
An introduction to academic inquiry and writing, laying the foundation for further academic and professional development. Students will learn to think and read critically and practice the writing process, including invention, research, summary, synthesis and analysis, revision, and editing. Students will work on several major writing assignments, including a research project in which they will gather information from a range of valid sources, demonstrating they can analyze and use that information purposefully, following appropriate documentation.
Fund of Literary Interpretation ENG 251 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course introduces literary genres such as fiction, poetry, drama, and literary theory for English and Humanities majors and minors.
Fund of Research & Presentation ENG 252 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course focuses on written and visual rhetoric, using multiple technologies to deliver and enhance a variety of texts aimed at various audiences.
Advanced Writing and Research ENG 301 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
Students learn how to reason carefully and express ideas clearly as they respond to a variety of rhetorical situations. Students develop these competencies as they learn to recognize strong arguments, uncover assumptions, evaluate evidence, recognize rhetorical patterns, and infer ideas from data. To apply these skills, students conduct advanced academic research and write summaries, reports, and essays synthesizing ideas from diverse sources.
Adv Research and Literary Analys ENG 314 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course emphasizes academic writing on literature, including close reading, textual analysis, and researched argument.
Language Theory - Grammar/Usage ENG 325 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course introduces the study of the English language with an emphasis on grammar, usage, semantics, and copyediting.
British Literature-18th Century ENG 332 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course examines works and authors of the Neoclassic and Romantic periods from Dryden to Keats and the influence of historical events, philosophical ideas, and literary trends.
American Lit - Realism & Modern ENG 335 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course examines works and authors of the Realism and Modern periods from Twain to Ellison and the influence of historical events, philosophical ideas, and literary trends on the works and authors.
Children's Literature ENG 355 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course introduces students to the spectrum of children's literature, past and present.
Rhetorical Studies ENG 450 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course explores theories and applications of the writing and reading processes.
The Family FAML 100 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course applies gospel truth and a supportive scholarship to strengthen marriage and family relationships using ?The Family: A Proclamation to the World? as the guiding framework.
Marriage Skills FAML 110 1 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course consists of the foundational principles of successful marriages with application to strengthening marriages.
Parenting Skills FAML 120 1 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course consists of foundational principles and basic skills of parent-child interaction. Students will apply typical decisions, problems, and opportunities encountered by parents.
Intro Marriage & Family Studies FAML 150 1 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This is an introductory and required course for all students desiring to obtain a major in Marriage and Family Studies (MFS). This course is inappropriate for non-majors. Students pursuing a minor or certificate in Marriage and Family Studies may also enroll in the course. This course includes an overview of historical and current scientific, societal, and family issues related to the family sciences. Applications will be made to career and advanced educational opportunities, as well as family, church, and community settings.
Family Relations FAML 160 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This is a survey course of family development across the lifespan, including the study of the family as a system, family interaction, and family roles. The course will emphasize the relationship of the family and its environment. Consideration is given to the cultural diversity and heritage of families.
Preparation for Marriage FAML 200 2 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course highlights skills, attitudes, behaviors, and principles needed to prepare oneself for a strong marriage and to wisely select a marriage partner. Preparation for marriage is also emphasized by focusing on healthy practices related to dating, courtship, engagement, and the transition following marriage.
Parenting FAML 220 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course involves a study of theories, principles, and practices needed to build nurturing and supportive parent-child relationships and to guide children toward healthy developmental outcomes.
Marriage FAML 300 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course focuses on contemporary issues affecting marriage, along with skills and principles needed to build strong and successful marriages.
Family Stress and Coping FAML 360 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course involes a study of families under stress, including the many external and internal influences that play a role in determining a family?s experience of stress. An ecological model will be used to understand potential risk factors that pose problems for families, along with protective factors that help families to be resilient. Focus will be maintained to learn ways to help families under stress.
Family Theories & Dynamics FAML 400 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course involves an in-depth look at family theories and their assumptions including systems theory, exchange theory, family development theory, symbolic interactionism, and others. Family processes related to power, communication, dysfunctions and addictions, rules and patterns of interaction, distance regulation, and family rituals will be explored. Students will use theory to develop intervention and prevention programs.
The Helping Relationship FAML 420 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This skill based course prepares students to effectively use interpersonal communication skills associated with helping individuals and families in a variety of settings. Role playing will be one of the primary learning methods. These skills are especially valuable for students planning to enter a human service profession, counseling/therapy, or planning to pursue graduate studies.
Family & Community Relationships FAML 430 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course consists of ecological and gospel perspectives on providing family-focused prevention and intervention services and support to diverse families. Emphasis will be on communicating with families, empowering parents, developing family and professional partnerships, interagency collaboration, and accessing and linking families and community resources.
Teaching Family Life Ed FAML 445 4 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course will give students practical experience by having them prepare the curriculum needed to teach a workshop or seminar on some aspect of family life. After preparing the curriculum, students will market the program, conduct the workshop, and evaluate the effectiveness of the education. A strong emphasis will be placed on how to teach effectively in group settings.
Child & Family Advocacy FAML 460 3 Materials required
The essence of this course is to learn how to promote and protect both the optimal well-being of children and the core strength of the family unit at all levels. To do this, students will use a bioecological systems approach to discern potential harm to children and families and effective solutions at each level. These levels or systems include the micro-, meso-, exo-, macro-, and chronosystems. Additionally, this course is multidisciplinary in that utilizes the fields of sociology, family studies, child development, political science, and communications. Related skills such as researching, writing, speaking, and social media will be taught. Child and family advocacy will teach students how the family is the most humane, economical, and powerful system known for building competence and character in people. Finally, the course equips students to see how the majority of challenges that children and families face are connected or interrelated, and thus the solutions are similarly correlated.
Intro Family & Consumer Sciences FCS 101 2 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course covers basic concepts, philosophy, career exploration, and professional development in the Family and Consumer Science area.
Food Safety and Sanitation FCS 110 1 Materials required
Students will learn proper food safety and sanitation processes in preparation for gaining food safety and sanitation industry-based certification. Credit will be granted upon successful completion of the Certification Examination.
Home & Family Resource Mgmt FCS 160 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course examines the basic, timeless concepts underlying the field of management including values, goal-setting, decision-making, resources, and planning as it relates to the home and family. Practical application of course content with the 7 Habits of Highly Effective College Students to build new, lasting behaviors of effectiveness as an individual and within families will be explored.
Apparel Construction I FCS 207 2 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course is for those with little or no sewing experience. Students will learn the application of construction principles from commercial patterns in making apparel. Emphasis will be on basic construction techniques and fundamental fitting. Materials approximately cost $50 or more.
Intro to Fashion Design FCS 208 2 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
Students will gain an overall understanding of the fashion industry, including: fashion history, fashion designers, The Movement of Fashion, principles and elements of design, product development, and global sourcing.
Pattern Making FCS 245 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course covers the principles of pattern making using basic drafting and flat-pattern techniques in half and full size patterns for woven and knit fabrics.
Money Management FCS 340 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course covers financial concepts of direct concern to the individual or family. Budgeting, financial institutions and services, consumer buying, use and control of credit, financial records, buying and selling homes, insurance, and basic investments will be explored.
Fitting and Alteration FCS 345 3 Spring 2022 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course involves the basic fitting and alteration of women's and men's patterns from constructed and ready-to-wear apparel clothing. Materials cost approximately $50 or more.
Textile Science FCS 360 3 Winter 2022 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course involves the study of fabric such as ! ber, yarns, and methods of construction and finishes. Students will apply this information to personal and client use.
Science of Meal Management FCS 364 3 Fall 2022 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course involves the implementation of meal management principles as they relate to controlling cost, providing satisfying meals, entertaining, conserving time and energy, using modern kitchen technology, and ensuring food safety. Students will plan and prepare food for meal service.
Teach Methods Fam/Consumer Sci FCS 405 3 Winter 2023 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This class is preparation for CTE secondary teaching, with application of teaching methods and theories used in occupational education classrooms and labs. Students will research best practices, how to incorporate academic skills (math, literacy, science, etc.) into the CTE classroom, and work collaboratively with other students in the course to create learning experiences that use these best practices. Students will also learn how to promote their programs and career through innovative classroom instruction and project based learning. Students will create a resource file for teaching methods and activities.
Family History Research Success FHGEN110 1 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course will help students understand what is required to be better family history researchers on their own, as ward consultants, as students in the Family History Research program, and as workers in the genealogical field. Students will be better prepared for success in incorporating and sharing high standards of family history work.
Internet and Computer Skills FHGEN120 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course is an introduction to genealogical software, key genealogical resources on the Internet, and the computer search skills essential for genealogical research. This course does not provide instruction in how to use a computer.
Paleography FHGEN130 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This online course is an introduction to paleography as it relates to genealogical research. Paleography is the study of ancient writing systems and the deciphering and dating of historical manuscripts. The course focuses on United States records, and introduces you to Old English, German, and Scandinavian scripts found in US and European records.
The Family and Society FHGEN160 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
Students will become familiar with the origins of, and purpose for, the United States record sources used to answer genealogical research questions. More in-depth information about sources introduced in the first year of study.
Research Methodology, Part 1 FHGEN211 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course teaches principles of effective genealogical research methodology. Students will plan strategies to solve research problems. They will use a variety of genealogical record types and sources to complete research assignments. Through assigned research projects, students will gain experience in describing a research projects, students will gain experience in describing a research problem, planning and executing a research strategy, compiling and analyzing evidence, assembling documents, citing sources, and producing a professional and well-organized report.
Research Methodology, Part 2 FHGEN212 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course provides further practice in effective genealogical research methodology. It is a continuation of Research Methodology Part One. Through assigned and self-selected research projects, students will gain experience in using various records and sources to solve genealogical problems and write professional-quality research reports.
Intro to F.H. Part One: Rcrd Grp FHGEN241 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This online course is an introduction to professional genealogical research principles and basic record groups. The course focuses on solving basic United States research problems using the Research Process. You will learn how to find original sources to answer genealogical questions, record genealogical information using professional standards, analyze information and evidence from key genealogical sources, and organize family history information. The course focuses on United States research. The principles and approaches can apply to worldwide family history research.
Intro to F.H. Part Two: Analysis FHGEN242 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This online course is an extension of FHGEN 241. It is a continued introduction to professional genealogical research methodology, evidence analysis, and beginning report writing. Students will learn how to use the Research Process to do the following: use facts, proofs, evidence, and sources to build a case for accurate genealogical conclusions, analyze and weigh evidence to meet genealogical proof standards, cite courses using professional standards, write sound conclusions, and place their ancestors in historical context. The course focuses on United States research. The principles and approaches can apply to worldwide family history research.
Geog Spec Course1: US Regions 1 FHGEN251A 3 Spring 2021, Winter 2022, Discontinued after W22 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course focuses on how to conduct genealogical research in the U.S. Regions. Through case studies and assignments, students will learn about records, including their geographical-historical background and principles of paleography. They will learn methods for reconstruction of individual families and understand the development of demographic and family history studies. Students will learn key record types for the area and how to use them to find genealogical information. Students will produce a research report on how they solved an area-specific research problem.
Geog Spec Course 1: B.I. Part 1 FHGEN251B 3 Fall 2021, Discontinued after F21 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course focuses on how to conduct genealogical research in the British Isles. Through case studies and assignments, students will learn about records, including their geographical-historical background and principles of paleography. They will learn methods for reconstruction of individual families and understand the development of demographic and family history studies. Students will learn key record types for the area and how to use them to find genealogical information. Students will produce a research report on how they solved an area-specific research problem.
Geog Spec Course2: US Research 2 FHGEN252A 3 Fall 2021, Discontinued after F21 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course focuses on how to conduct genealogical research in the U. S. Regions. Through case studies and assignments, students will learn about records, including their geographical-historical background and principles of paleography. They will learn methods for reconstruction of individual families and understand the development of demographic and family history studies. Students will learn key record types for the area and how to use them to find genealogical information. Students will produce a research report on how they solved an area-specific research problem.
Geog Spec Course 2: B.I. Part 2 FHGEN252B 3 Spring 2021, Winter 2022, Discontinued after W22 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course focuses on how to conduct genealogical research in the British Isles. Through case studies and assignments, students will learn about records, including their geographical-historical background and principles of paleography. They will learn methods for reconstruction of individual families and understand the development of demographic and family history studies. Students will learn key record types for the area and how to use them to find genealogical information. Students will produce a research report on how they solved an area-specific research problem.
Genealogy as a Business FHGEN270 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course teaches students how to establish and manage a research business, or be hired by a genealogical company. Students will also learn about other job opportunities for genealogists. They will create a professional resume and prepare a business portfolio using various media (including print and electronic) that contains a career assessment, strengths, and weaknesses worksheet, interview report, goal plan, business plan, marketing plan, written contract, written bid, and code of ethics worksheet.
Genealogical Writing FHGEN340 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course teaches the principles of effective report writing for a variety of genealogical projects, including formatting, documentation, source citations, and presentation of genealogical data and evidence. Through case studies, students will learn how to prepare effective genealogical reports for clients.
U.S. Geographic Specialization FHGEN351 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course focuses on how to conduct genealogical research in the New England, Upper-South, and Southeast United States regions, as well as how to conduct big city and African American research. Through case studies and assignments, students will learn about records, including their geographical-historical background and principles of paleography. They will learn methods for reconstruction of individual families and understand the development of demographic and family history studies. Students will learn key record types for the area and how to use them to find genealogical information. Students will produce a research report on how they solved an area-specific research problem.
Introductory Genetic Genealogy FHGEN352 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
Students will be introduced to the ethics and basic concepts of using DNA as a tool in genealogical research. They will learn about different companies that offer DNA testing. Additionally, they will learn how to use autosomal DNA, mitochondrial DNA, Y chromosome DNA, and X chromosome DNA to enhance genealogical research and how ato use DNA results in research reports. Students do not need to have taken a DNA test and they will not be using personal DNA results in the course.
Research Methodology FHGEN411 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course teaches principles of effective genealogical research methodology for solving difficult problems using U.S. and global record collections. Students will plan strategies to solve research problems. They will use a variety of genealogical record types and sources to complete research projects. Through assigned research projects, students will gain experience in describing a research problem, planning and executing a research strategy, compiling and analyzing evidence, assembling documents, citing sources, and producing professional and well-organized reports. This course will give students real-world research experience that they would encounter with professional client research.
Directed Geographic Specialty FHGEN499R 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
In this course, students will apply the skills they have gained in the Family History Applied Associates Degree program as they learn about earning professional genealogical credentials. Students will practice evidentiary analysis and writing skills. Students will learn about real-world genealogical environments and adapt to new geographic research areas. Student will gain experience in completing a directed three or four-generation research project.
Intro to Finance for Non-majors FIN 201 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This is an introductory course to familiarize non-business majors with the basic vocabulary and substantive knowledge of personal finance, financial institutions, and business finance. The course will provide an opportunity to develop skills in effective communication, financial analysis, and problem solving. Ethics in the area of finance will be discussed.
Financial Management FIN 301 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This introductory course in financial management provides a basic foundation for other courses in finance and business management. Topics covered in this course include financial statement analysis, financial forecasting, leverage, working capital management, capital structure, capital budgeting, short and long-term financial management, sources of financing, time value of money, and cost of capital.
Advanced Financial Management FIN 401 3 Fall 2022 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
Investments FIN 410 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This introductory course in investments provides a basic foundation for advanced courses in investments and securities analysis. Topics covered in this course include elements of investments, portfolio theory, debt securities, equities, security analysis, derivative markets, investment processes, behavioral finance, and technical analysis.
Financial Planning FIN 418 3 Fall 2022 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
Personal Finance FIN 433 1 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course is a part of the business Management Integrated Finance Emphasis program. The primary purpose of this course is for students to learn to apply personal financial management tools to their own and their clients' lives. The content covers advanced time value of money, retirement planning strategies, tax-deferred retirement planning vehicles, asset allocation, specific investment products, insurance, estate planning, and financial planning strategies. Students broaden their understanding and develop skills through problem solving using Excel, through case studies, and through application to existing personal financial management situations.
Financing New Ventures FIN 475 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course is a part of the Business Management Integrated Finance Emphasis program. An overview of all the options available to successfully finance new ventures. Financing alternatives are explored including debt financing from venture banks, commercial banks, and SBICs, and equity financing from angels, private placements, venture capitalists, and public equity markets.
Online University Skills GE 103 1 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This class is parallel to PC 103 that is taken by PathwayConnect students. This course will be taken by online-only students that matriculate to BYU-I without having completed PathwayConnect. In this course, learners will discover and strengthen the skills they need for success as an online student.
American Heritage GECIV100 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course gives students a basic understanding of the American founding, the U.S. Constitution, the free-market economic system, and American culture with the goal of helping students apply Constitutional principles and social science insights to contemporary situations.
Global Hotspot: Pakistan GEINT211 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
Few countries in the world are more strategically critical yet less understood than Pakistan. This young country in an ancient land lies at the crossroads of history, religion, language, and culture. On the front-line in the war against terror, this nuclear power is in the midst of political turmoil whose outcome will have great implications for the rest of the world. Content and Topics: Topics covered in this course include: the Taliban; the partition of British India; geography; history; foreign policy; Kashmir; culture; religion; nuclear weapons; language and tribalism; economics; Islamic militancy; the Afghan-Soviet war; and the 2005 earthquake. Additional readings may be required.
Physical Geology GEOL 111 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This introductory course is designed specifically for science and engineering majors, though anyone can enroll who is curious about active geologic processes and resources. The course focuses on recognizing and understanding how observed features on Earth came to exist and what will likely occur in the future. The course is offered on-line and on-campus. Students taking Geology 111 on-campus are encouraged but not required to register concurrently (the same semester) for GEOL 111L (Lab) depending on their degree. Those taking it on-line are also invited to take the lab concurrently if possible or as soon as they can.
Intro GIS & Spatial Analysis GEOL 340 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
GIS is the science of collecting, visualizing, and analyzing data associated with location. Among other applications, GIS analysts use location to help mitigate environmental hazards, assess building sites, organize physical assets, find mineral resources, map animal migration, optimize supply chains, site a new business, track pollutants, and plan urban growth and sustainability. Professionals in geology, engineering, agriculture, business, and the environmental, data, and social sciences are expected to have a working knowledge of GIS concepts and skills. This project-based class introduces those concepts and provides hands-on experience using industry-standard GIS software (ArcGIS Pro) to work with spatially referenced and attributed vector and raster data. Most applications are specific to the natural sciences and engineering, but concepts learned are applicable across industries and platforms.
Beginning German I GER 101 4 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
Introduction of vocabulary, language structures, and cultural topics, with an emphasis on the language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing.
From Atoms to Humans GESCI101 3 Materials required
Explores the origins of the universe, Earth, and life and applies the principles of both discovered and revealed truth to address questions that lie at the science-religion interface. The class examines the nature, power, and limitations of science and its impacts on society. These topics are explored through the study of breakthrough scientific discoveries that demonstrate the nature of scientific inquiry.
Sustaining Human Life GESCI110 3 Materials required
This course addresses two crucial and compelling questions facing the world: how will we feed 9 billion people by the year 2050, and how will we care for those 9 billion people? Students will investigate the challenges and opportunities involved with creating a sustainable food supply, promoting healthy lifestyles, and providing health care for everyone. Students will also be introduced to the wide range of programs and degrees within the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and the resulting opportunities for promising careers. This is the recommended Natural Science GE course for those majoring in the Life Sciences, such as Biology, Agriculture, Exercise Physiology and Healthcare related fields, and is one of two recommended courses for non-science majors.
Natural Disasters GESCI201 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
Examine the causes and consequences of natural hazards including earthquakes, volcanoes, landslides, floods, and coastal hazards. Students work in a team environment and examine case studies of ancient and modern events, emphasizing effects on science, engineering, history, economics, politics, and the arts. Study lessons learned from past events and determine what is being done or should be done to mitigate future disasters. Class includes a field trip.
Environmental Stewardship GESCI203 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
As individuals, it is often difficult to see or understand the consequences our decisions, actions, or existence may have on our environment and those around us. The purpose of this class is to show the effects each of us has as a member of a worldwide population of over seven billion, and the effects our population has on a local, regional, and global scale. The focus will be on how individually and collectively we impact the quality of our environment and human living conditions for both good and bad. Case studies will be used to examine an array of ecological, biological, agricultural, technological, economical, social, political and other issues associated with a burgeoning human population. Class members will receive a foundation whereby they can make informed choices about their life, family, and community, and be better stewards of Earth's resources.
DNA: Identity, Disease, Design GESCI205 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
The structure of DNA stands as one of the greatest discoveries of the 20th century and has led to multi-billion dollar advancements in medicine and agriculture. An understanding of DNA and its applications is necessary to distinguish fact from fiction, make informed decisions, and take full advantage of emerging DNA technologies. This course presents the fundamental concepts related to DNA including its history, structure, function, regulation, and inheritance. The remaining course material explores multiple issues and topics that are founded in DNA technology. These include the causes and treatments associated with genetic disorders, the creation of genetically modified foods, identification through DNA fingerprinting, tracing of family lineages, the applications and ethics of cloning and stem cell technology, and the underlying mechanism of organic evolution. Course methods include lecture, discussion, and hands-on exercises related to the subject material.
Career Exploration GS 100 1 Winter 2022 Materials required
Deciding on a major and career can seem overwhelming. Learn about career exploration tools and resources that can clarify your path by connecting your identity and purpose to future possibilities in the world of work. Career assessments and activities are designed to broaden awareness of your strengths, values, and interests. Career research with online tools and informational interviews broadens your knowledge of specific careers and industries. Discover the model of career exploration that encourages an active approach to making important education and career decisions with deep awareness as you pursue a career and life calling.
Devotional Class GS 104 1 Materials required
The purpose of this course is to help online students get a deeper experience from devotional addresses, to develop their discipleship by being reminded of who they are and their purpose on earth, and to see the blessings of applying gospel principles in their live
Study and Life Skills GS 105 2 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course is available to all students, but is especially recommended for new students. All colleges, including BYU-Idaho have a unique culture of teaching and learning that differs substantially from high school and other life experiences. This may take students by surprise. This class is designed to help new students make a smooth transition from high school, and other life experiences, to college and BYU-Idaho. The purpose of the class is to introduce students to BYU-Idaho, equip them with basic college study skills, familiarize them with campus resources, provide them with eight strategies for creating success, and offer them a safe setting to ask questions and get answers.
Technology Basics GS 107 1 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
Demonstrate safe internet use, internet safety and proper digital citizenship. Demonstrate understanding of proper digital copyright usage. Use a computer operating system to access computer applications and organize information, use the essential features of a spreadsheet, use the essential features of a word processor, use the essential features of a presentation, define what a cloud-based technology is, and demonstrate the use and understanding of a cloud-based collaborative tool. This class will have mid-week and weekly assignments, a final project, and an end-of-class final. This class requires Microsoft Office or an application that will export to Microsoft Office correctly, Microsoft Live Account, Google Docs Account, other cloud-based technology accounts, and access to the Internet. The weekly assignments and final project will determine your class score.
Career Development GS 170 1 Materials required
In this course, students develop resources, professional connections and essential employability skills to obtain or improve employment in a field related to their university certificate. Students will network and apply for job opportunities in their industry. The life-long skills gained in this course are valuable for both active and future job seekers.
Decision Making and Leadership GS 294 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
Students and instructors in this course use case studies to explore principles of decision making and disciple leadership. Students author many of the cases. Requirements include preparing cases, contributing to online and in-class discussion, and writing a personal reflection journal and a final paper.
Professional Projects GS 497 2 Winter 2022 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course helps students apply the concepts and skills they have learned in their coursework to a professional project. During the first week of the course, students identify an appropriate 50-hour project they can use for the course. Projects fit into one of three areas: work-related projects, service and volunteer projects, or personal professional development projects. In addition to completing the 50-hour project, students complete tasks and assignments that help promote professional development and career readiness.
Introduction to Global Supply Chain & Operations GSO 125 3 Winter 2022 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
Intro to Arch/Landscape Design HORT 230 3 Winter 2022 Materials required
An introduction to the history, theory, graphics, and process of landscape design enabling students to begin designing landscapes that are functional, artistic, sustainable, water-wise, and beautiful. Students will learn the elements and principles of design as applied to landscape architecture and design, how to draw and color rend hand graphics using scale, and the steps of the design process. This course is an exploratory class for all majors who may elect landscape design, construction, or maintenance as a career and is a pre-requisite for higher level landscape design and construction courses.
Personal Health & Wellness HS 132 2 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course is designed to give students knowledge and tools to live a life of optimal wellness. Students will learn how wellness is a compilation of positive choices throughout the day that leads to a life of balance. The course will cover the five areas of Wellness: Physical, Social, Emotional, Spiritual and, Intellectual/Mental. In each area the student will learn the principles associated with living well. They will have opportunities to incorporate the concepts into their own lives. Recognizing wellness diminishing activities in everyday life and gaining the tools to overcome those challenges will be presented and students will learn positive lifestyle changes that can lead to the highest quality of life.
Intro to Public Health HS 240 2 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course introduces agencies, facilities, and programs that play a role in the prevention of disease and the promotion of health in the public. Special emphasis is placed on the competencies needed for public health professionals to function in a variety of settings.
Medical Terminology HS 280 2 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This is an introduction course into the language of medicine.
Hospital & Health Administration HS 285 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
Each of the twelve focuses for this course are listed in the course outline. They are designed to introduce students to the possibility of pursuing a career in healthcare administration. Materials for the course are drawn from a variety of publications and electronic sources. The course materials and syllabus will be available via I-learn.
Medical Law and Ethics HS 304 2 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course is an introduction to the legal aspects of medical care including fundamental statues of the common laws that govern the physician-patient relationship, medical ethics, and federal and state regulatory agencies. Current issues involving medical ethics are discussed.
Environmental Health HS 310 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course teaches aspects of human health that impact the quality of life as determined by physical, biological, social, and psychosocial factors in the environment. Students are provided with a concise knowledge base of how air, water, food, and environmental agents may affect overall health.
Communicable & Non-Comm Diseases HS 320 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
In this course students will be able to clearly describe and communicate important aspects of the disease process including the physiology of inflammation, the chain of infection, six groups of micro-organisms, and differentiate between four types of acquired immunity. They will be able to define, identify, compare, and contrast over 200 specific diseases/disorders. Students will then be able to explain, differentiate, and compare the etiology and common signs and symptoms, diagnostic procedures, treatment, prognosis affecting major body systems including the cardiovascular, pulmonary, endocrine, nervous, musculoskeletal, reproductive, renal, urinary and integumentary systems. They will be able to critically analyze a patient's clinical presentation and be able to identify a potential diagnosis based on the patient's history, pertinent symptoms and exam findings, and diagnostic procedure. Students will also be able to analyze and employ different resources needed to remain current.
Healthcare Finance HS 345 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course is an introduction to Healthcare Finance for Healthcare Administration majors who contemplate careers in administration - hospitals, ambulatory surgical centers, specialty hospitals, integrated health systems, long-term care facilities, and medical group practices.
Epidemiology HS 370 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course is the study of the distribution of diseases and pathophysiological conditions of humans and of factors which influence their occurrence. The course requires an understanding of statistical principles.
Managing Healthcare Provider Org HS 375 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course is designed to introduce Healthcare Administration majors to the specific issues and body of knowledge pertaining to the management of hospitals, specialty hospitals, ambulatory surgery centers, medical group practices, and long-term care facilities. Emphasis is placed on guest lectures by professionals from each of these types of provider organizations.
Healthcare Strategy HS 378 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course is designed for Healthcare Administration majors and focuses on leadership and management methods and strategies. Part 2 utilizes case studies to illustrate important skills and methods.
Program Evaluation HS 381 2 Fall 2021 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
Evaluation is one of the 10 essential public health functions, one of the 7 core competencies of health education, and is critical to effective practice. This course will cover the skills and knowledge necessary to conduct program evaluation. Students will be able to design appropriate process, impact and outcome evaluation. They will also discuss the ethical issues involved in evaluation.
Industrial Fire Safety HS 384 2 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course introduces students to the International Fire Code orienting them to the basics of understanding of how to read code, interpret code, and apply modern codes in various situations. Students will enjoy learning in a hands-on fashion as they visit a variety of local businesses in Rexburg and on campus to perform fire code enforcement inspections. They will learn to develop and write reports and inspection forms to use in their enforcement inspections. Students seeking work in fields related to Occupational Health and Safety, Firefighting, Public Safety, Insurance, Corporate Safety, etc. should take this course.
Program Planning/Implementation HS 390 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course provides the framework for skill development in organizaion, planning, and implementing comprehensive health promotion programs. Key topics include: planning models, needs assessment, intervention theories/models, budgeting, marketing, and implementation practices. This course meets some requirements for taking the Certified Health Education Specialist (CHES) exam.
Research Methods HS 391 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course is an introduction to scientific writing, assessment instruments, data collection, research design, and statistical analysis. This will help prepare students to take the CHES exam. Students will be able to define plagiarism and recognize when it is present in their own writing and in the writing of others. They will also be able to propose, design and conduct a small research project, work collaboratively and effectively with other people to meet a common goal, and present their research findings through written and oral communication. Students will understand their relationship between scientific and spiritual inquiry, the strengths and limitations of each, and the role of each in the pursuit of truth.
Community Health Methods HS 401 2 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course is designed to give students practical hands-on experience of health promotion skills that a health promotion educator will use.
Health Behavior Theories/Models HS 420 2 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course provides a basic and theoretical understanding of the social, emotional/mental, physical, and lifestyle factors related to human behavior. Practical strategies are used to identify barriers to behavior and to enhance and improve health. This course will prepare students to take the CHES exam.
Manage Tech in HC Provider Orgs HS 425 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course is designed to provide information and skills for managing technology in provider organizations. Emphasis is placed on department-by-department technologies, manufacturers, group purchasing organizations, analytical tools and methods, the fixed asset file, depreciation of capital assets, and capital budgeting.
Drugs of Use and Abuse HS 460 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course is designed to give students the nature and effects of specific drugs from all major classes on human beings from the physiological, psychological, and sociological viewpoints.
Healthcare Insurance Industry HS 465 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course is for Healthcare Administration majors. It focuses on third-party reimbursement and payment methodologies, beginning with CMS (Medicare and Medicaid), Traditional Indemnity Insurance, and Managed Care. It also analyzes the business office functions that permit a healthcare organization to maximize reimbursement and to negotiate and administrate contracts with third-party providers.
Health Communications HS 472 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course is designed to give students an exposure to different areas of communication and instructs them on how to most effectively distribute health information. Programs will be administered according to what an individual will most likely encounter while working in the field of Health Promotion or Worksite Wellness. There will be specific assignments that will be completed in the course of the semester. This course will cover other areas as time permits.
International Health HS 480 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course explores meaning of "health" as it applies to people of many different cultures throughout the world. Provides an international evaluation of the health status of these many different cultures, including their morbidity and mortality rates. This course also evaluates the many health promotion methods used to create healthy lifestyles and environmental concerns among these cultures.
Accident Invest and Prevention HS 484 2 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course covers the theory and function of accident investigations, reporting, documentation, and analysis systems. Form design, utilization, and cost-evaluation procedures will be discussed.
Occupational Safety & Risk Mgmt HS 486 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course is designed to develop an understanding of basic occupational safety and health terminology, principles, and practices through education and practical activities.
Intro to Hospitality & Tour Mgmt HTMBC110 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
In HTMBC 110, you will learn the basic concepts and skills needed for a career in the hospitality and tourism industry. You will learn about different sectors in the industry such as transportation, accommodations, food & beverage, recreation, entertainment, and travel services. You will also learn marketing skills, customer service skills and trends happening within the industry. By the end of this course, you will have created a personal development plan for your future in the industry. This will include the current skills you could bring to a hospitality/tourism position, as well as the knowledge, skills, and attitudes you still need to develop to contribute to an organization in which you have interest. This course was developed with the subject matter expertise and oversight of the LDS Business College (LDSBC) in collaboration with BYU-Hawaii.
Teams and Hospitality HTMBC130 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course provides students with communication and interpersonal strategies designed to build positive relationships with individuals and groups in the modern hospitality and tourism workplace. Through practical projects, simulations, reading, critical thinking exercises, problem-solving scenarios, written assignments, and case studies, students develop the human relations skills required to interact effectively with people at work. Interpersonal and team building skills that are crucial to ethical relationships with members of management, co-workers, direct reports, customers, and the public are examined. Also, interpersonal and organizational applications associated with group/team functions, multicultural and multigenerational relationships, leadership, coaching, and customer satisfaction are presented to assist students with the timely identification and resolution of communication issues and challenges. This course was developed with the subject matter expertise and oversight of the LDS Business College (LDSBC) in collaboration with BYU-Hawaii.
Accommodations Operations HTMBC150 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
In HTMBC 150, you will learn the basic concepts and skills needed for a career in the accommodations sector of the hospitality and tourism industry. This course will introduce accommodation operations and its many facets including: terminology, types of lodging, organizational/functional structure, employee/supervisor/manager roles in each function, customer service/problem resolution, hotel software applications, industry metrics including: operational/financial/market/guest service/quality assurance metrics, hotel sales, revenue management and global industry trends. It will also help students acquire career skills such as: interviewing and networking. This course was developed with the subject matter expertise and oversight of the LDS Business College (LDSBC) in collaboration with BYU-Hawaii.
Food and Beverage HTMBC220 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
In HTMB 220, you will learn and apply the skills needed to become a professional in the foodservice industry, which include menu planning, purchasing, storage, food production, service, sanitation and food safety, marketing, and business planning. You will create a business plan for a restaurant and learn how to satisfy local regulations for sanitation and food safety. This course was developed with the subject matter expertise and oversight of the LDS Business College (LDSBC) in collaboration with BYU-Hawaii.
Hospitality & Tour Finance Mgmt HTMBC240 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course will introduce students to essential managerial accounting and financial principles as they relate to the hospitality and tourism industry. Core subjects introduced in the course include financial statement analysis, cost analysis and control, menu pricing, forecasting, budgeting, labor planning, inventory control and capital budgeting. Students gain applied understanding of the material through industry-simulated assignments and projects. This course was developed with the subject matter expertise and oversight of the LDS Business College (LDSBC) in collaboration with BYU-Hawaii.
Introduction to the Humanities HUM 110 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
Students will examine contributions in human culture through key works of visual art, music, theatre, literature, and cinema. Emphasis is placed on studying artistic principles and developing value judgment skills which will prepare students for life-long enjoyment and appreciation of the arts.
Applied Learning Project IDS 297R 1 Materials required
The ALPS (Applied Learning Projects) Program is an opportunity for students to be placed in teams of three to six students and work on a scope of work for a client. Students will be required to meet with their team (remotely) once a week at an arranged time. They will also meet with clients weekly at an arranged time. ALPS projects come from a wide range of clients and industries. There are a wide variety of projects that are applicable to all majors. Students are expected to work 8 to 10 hours per week on the project for the duration of the semester. Although ALPS projects happen offsite from the client?s office, the experience it offers will be similar to completing a part-time internship for a business. The experience begins with training sessions or recordings for the first two weeks. Project assignments are determined by student interest and abilities. To learn more about the ALPS basic program visit http://alps.rbdcenter.org/alps-basic/. This course is available to both online and on campus students. Please note that if you register for IDS 297R you may not also get academic credit for your ALPS Basic project in another internship or practicum course.
Interdisciplinary Capstone IDS 499 2 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
Students will create an approved capstone project or paper to showcase the skills and competencies developed in their interdisciplinary major. Senior students will work closely with a professional mentor, faculty advisor, and/or peers to develop a project or research paper that demonstrates the fusion of their undergraduate coursework and experiences. Projects and papers should be significant and relevant to the student's academic or career objectives. Students in this course will demonstrate senior-level proficiency in research, visual communication, writing, and presentation skills. Content and Topics: The capstone project is the culminating experience of the Interdisciplinary Studies Degree. Students will propose, complete and present a project that is academically and professionally meaningful based upon their areas of study and career goals.
Intro to International Studies INTST100 1 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course provides potential International Studies majors an opportunity to survey five separate areas of emphasis within international studies, the academic demands of the major, and possible career and post-baccalaureate options arising from this major.
Research Skills LR 111 1 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This is an introductory course for anyone who wants to improve their ability to research and analyze information more efficiently. Students learn to define a research issue and evaluate information sources. Emphasis is placed on available library services and navigating library resources, including research databases. This course is open to students of all majors and will be particularly beneficial to anyone wanting to improve their research and information finding skills.
Beginning Algebra MATH 100B 2 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
The arithmetic of integers and rational numbers as well as an introduction to algebra will be studied. This course is recommended for those needing basic algebra before taking progressively higher math courses.
Intermediate Algebra MATH 101 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course will cover the fundamental operations of algebra, properties of exponents, solving linear, fractional, radical and quadratic equations, graphing linear, and quadratic functions. Math 101 may not be taken for credit if MATH 110X (FDMAT 110) has been completed with a grade of ?B? or higher.
Math for the Real World MATH 108X 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
Precalculus MATH 109 5 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course includes a combination of College Algebra and Trigonometry. It is intended to prepare students for Calculus or other math and science courses. Elementary analysis of functions having discrete or connected domains, methods of solving equations, and systems of equations and matrices will be explored. Triangle relationships, graphs of periodic functions, trigonometric identities, inverse trigonometric functions, and applications of trigonometry will also be covered.
Trigonometry MATH 111 2 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course studies the six trigonometric functions and their inverses. Topics include: measuring triangles, vectors, graphs, and solving equations. Applications of trigonometry will be emphasized throughout the course.
Calculus I MATH 112X 4 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course includes the study of limits, continuity, derivatives, integrals, and transcendental functions. Properties and applications of the above.
Multivariable Calculus MATH 215 4 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
In this course students will study polar coordinates, parametric curves, vectors, vector geometry, vector-valued functions, partial derivatives, gradient, optimization, multiple integration, vector fields, and operations on scalar and vector fields. Emphasis will be on methods and applications. Math 215 and Math 214 cannot both be taken for credit.
Business Statistics MATH 221A 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
In this course business students will study graphical represenstation of data, measure of center and spread, elementary probability, sampling distributions, correlation and regression, statistical inference involving means, proportions, and contingency tables.
Biostatistics MATH 221B 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
In this course students will study graphical representations of data, measures of center and spread, elementary probability, sampling distributions, correlations and regression, statistical inference involving means, proportions, and contingency tables, odds ratio and relative risk.
Social Science Statistics MATH 221C 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
In this course students will study graphical representation of data, measures of center and spread, elementary probability, sampling distributions, correlation and regression, statistical inference involving means, proportions, and contingency tables.
Data Wrangling & Visualization MATH 335 3 Winter 2022 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
Use data-driven programming in R and Python for the handling, formatting, and visualization of messy and complex data. Students will implement data handling techniques and the grammar of graphics process in visualizing complex data. Course will be cross listed as CS335
Body Systems 1 MCO 201A 2 Winter 2022 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
Medical Coding 1 MCO 201B 2 Winter 2022 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
Body Systems 2 MCO 202A 2 Winter 2022 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
Medical Coding 2 MCO 202B 2 Winter 2022 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
Body Systems 3 MCO 203A 2 Winter 2022 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
Body Systems and Coding 4 MCO 204 2 Winter 2022 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
Medical Coding Lab MCO 205 2 Winter 2022 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
Introduction to Medical Billing and Coding (ENSIGN COLLEGE) MCOPC180 3 Fall 2021 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
Engineering Computation I ME 142 3 Materials required
This course provides an introduction to computation in the context of engineering problem solving. Fundamental principles of computation, such as computer representation of numbers and round-off error, are presented. Basic numerical methods, including numerical integration, differentiation, and root finding, are covered. An introduction to computer programming, including flowcharts, loops, condition statements, and functions, is given. Emphasis is placed on using MS Excel to solve computational problems, using VBA within Excel to create computer programs, and use of a commercial math software package.
Fundamentals in 2D CADD ME 162 3 Materials required
Computer aided drafting and design using AutoCAD software. Topics include coordinate systems, display control, basic geometric construction and editing, scales, layer, annotation and dimensions, blocks, attributes, plotting. Applications in mechanical, civil, electrical, and architectural disciplines.
Parametric Mechanical CAD ME 172 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course is designed to help students develop employable and certifiable skills in parametric CAD modeling of mechanical components and assemblies. Students will work toward associate level and then professional certification in SolidWorks and have the opportunity to take the CSWA and CSWP exams. The course focuses on training students to think parametrically and to strategically capture design intent within 3D CAD models and assemblies.
Engineering Mechanics: Statics ME 201 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
Concepts of forces, moments and other vector quantities, free body diagrams, particle and rigid body statics, trusses, frames and machines, friction, centroids, and moments of inertia. Vector analysis used.
Strength of Materials ME 202 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
Review of equations of static equilibrium; introduction to engineering stress and strain; thermal loading; stress distributions and deflections resulting from axial, torsional, and transverse (beam) loadings; combined loading problems; stress and strain transformation, Mohr's circle; column buckling.
Engineering Mechanics: Dynamics ME 204 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
The study and application of the concepts of dynamics to particles, systems of particles, and rigid bodies. Scalar and vector analysis used.
Manufacturing Processes I ME 231 2 Materials required
Materials Science ME 250 3 Materials required
Atomic structure and microstructure of engineering materials, including metals, ceramics, polymers, and composites. Factors influencing the fabrication, processing, and selection of materials in engineering analysis and design. Case studies of engineering material failures. Use of material selection.
CAD and ME Drawings ME 272 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course is designed to help students develop employable and certifiable skills in creating mechanical engineering drawings to communicate product manufacturing and inspection information. Students will work toward the SolidWorks Drawing Tools certification and have the opportunity to take the CSWPA-DT exam. The course focuses on training students to interpret and create complete working drawing packages of mechanical devices and assemblies.
Manufacturing Processes I MET 231 2 RENUMBERED MET 231 Spring 2021 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
Introduction to manufacturing processes. Topics include: basic material science, mass reduction processes (milling, turning, drilling, etc.), separating and deforming processes (cutting, shearing, bending, etc.), mass conserving processes (casting and polymer/composite processes), joining processes (thermal, mechanical, and chemical), finishing processes, new technologies in manufacturing, and measuring tools.
Sales & Customer Relations MKT 120 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This beginning course is designed to introduce the student to the benefits of persuasive selling and building relationships. Skills learned and practiced will benefit the student for a lifetime. Self-confidence will increase as a result of the opportunity to practice the skills of persuasive presentations. Provides an opportunity for the student to explore the possibility of a career in sales, but will benefit the student in any career chosen.
Web Business Creation MKT 250 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course is designed for any student interested in building a web-based business. Students will go through the necessary steps to build and launch a web-based business that is capable of accepting online payments.
Marketing Management MKT 341 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course is a comprehensive introduction to the principles of marketing. This course will cover marketing essentials such as consumer research, consumer segmentation, segment targeting and product positioning, new product development and introduction, marketing strategy, branding, marketing communications, pricing, and distribution.
Social Media Marketing MKT 351 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
Social media marketing prepares students to become proficient with various platforms while staying up-to-date on the latest best practices and exploring the power of social media marketing. This course provides students with practical, real-world experiences and proven social media marketing techniques and strategies.
Practical Musicianship MUSIC130 3 Materials required
This course is designed to benefit students of all majors who have an interest in music. No prior musical experience is necessary. Learning experiences provide students with opportunities in leadership, interpersonal skills, problem solving, constructive criticism, empathy, and persistence. Students will demonstrate these skills through interpreting written music, singing accurately and with proper vocal technique, performing on a keyboard instrument, conducting in various time signatures, and selecting repertoire for religious services.
Essentials of Human Nutrition NUTR 150 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course consists of the food-oriented study of nutrition, evaluation of nutrition information, identification of the role of nutrients in the body, assessment of dietary intakes, and the promotion of healthy eating.
Nutrient Metabolism NUTR 200 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course consists of the nutrient oriented study of nutrition facts and principles; metabolic consequences of nutrient intakes; techniques of communicating valid nutrition concepts.
Introductory Applied Physics I PH 105 4 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This is an algebra-based introductory general physics course, including a lab component. Target students for this course include those interested in pre-med, dental, physical therapy, construction management, and so on. This course introduces the student to the following topics: kinematics, dynamics, work and energy, rotations, gravitation, heat and thermodynamics, fluids.
Principles of Physics I PH 121 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This is the first course of the calculus-based Principles of Physics sequence. The course is designed for students majoring in physics, engineering, chemistry, and mathematics. The course centers on mechanics, the study of forces and motion as described through Newton's three laws of motion, and the concept of energy.
Engineering Physics PH 223 4 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course is designed for students majoring in mechanical engineering and chemistry. It is a one-semester calculus based physics course covering topics in waves, electricity, magnetism, and optics. These areas of study are important in a wide variety of engineering applications. For example, an understanding of wave properties is essential in the proper design of structures. A knowledge of electric and magnetic fields is required for any system that involves transmission of electrons for either communication or power generation purposes. Finally, principles of optics are involved in fiber-optic communication, instrument design, scanners, surveillance, etc.
Introduction to Project Management PM 140 3 Winter 2022 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
Advanced Project Management PM 200 3 Winter 2022 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
Introduction to Project Management (ENSIGN COLLEGE) PMPC 140 3 Fall 2021 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
American Government POLSC110 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course consists of an English background of American institutions, colonial systems of government, the Constitution, and the evolution and adoption of government to the changing role of the United States as an industrialized member of the world of nations and the changing federal/state relations.
Intro to Comparative Politics POLSC150 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This class challenges preconceived notions about the proper role of government. Employing comparative methods, we examine the strengths and weaknesses of different ways of organizing government, paying special attention to the interaction of political, economic, and social structures within various countries. Students will develop skills that will help them 1) to understand why governments behave as they do, 2) to analyze the effectiveness of political structures and behaviors, and 3) to propose policies a government might adopt to address domestic or international issues.
International Politics POLSC170 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course consists of the study of the geographic, demographic, economic, and ideological factors affecting international behavior, including the function of power, diplomacy, international law, and organization
General Psychology PSYCH111 3 Materials required
This is an introductory course in Psychology which surveys the various fields of psychology and application of selected psychological principles to life situations.
Career Development in Psychology PSYCH112 1 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course is designed to provide a broad overview of the career opportunities in psychology. Students will explore the different opportunities available in each level of training, i.e. baccalaureate, masters, and doctorate and focus on how to maximize the chances of being accepted into a competitive graduate program. Students will also explore various professional issues including APA accreditation, licensure and certification, ethics, and future trends. Students will be required to participate in career development testing in the career center, begin developing their own application materials (vita/resume, cover letter, biographical sketch, statements of purpose, strength/weakness, etc.), participate in videotaped mock interviews, and set out a three to four year career plan. This course is intended for those students who have already decided to major in psychology, rather than those who are simply curious about the field.
Developmental Psych Lifespan PSYCH201 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course consists of the study of biological, affective, social, and cognitive aspects of development through the life span.
Research Methods PSYCH302 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course explores the basic principles of conducting research in psychology. Some of the topics include, but are not limited to: research design, data collection, analysis, reporting results, and ethics of doing research. This course should be completed by the beginning of junior year.
History & Systems of Psychology PSYCH311 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course studies the historical movements and intellectual commitments of the past, early pioneers in the field of psychology, contemporary issues and assumptions that form the discipline of psychology. This class should be completed by the beginning of junior year.
Abnormal Psychology PSYCH342 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course is designed to give students a basic understanding of the history, research methods, classification, assessment, diagnosis, causes (etiology), course, prognosis, and treatment of the mental disorders. Given that there is sufficient literature to warrant a separate course on each disorder, the focus will be limited to gaining a general understanding of the current issues being faced by mental health professionals with respect to the aforementioned overview.
Social Psychology PSYCH350 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course is the scientific study of how people influence each other. Specifically, social psychology, as a discipline of the social and behavioral sciences, seeks to understand how people's thoughts, feelings, and behaviors are influenced by other people. Hence, social psychology seeks to explain how people influence each other (descriptive) and why people influence each other (explanatory).
Cognition PSYCH376 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course provides an introduction into prominent theories and research in cognitive psychology. Students will learn about (a) ways in which the mind and brain organize the chaotic world in which we live, (b) how the separate but interrelated processes of attention, perception, memory, and visual imagery work together to produce everyday phenomena like knowledge, reasoning, problem-solving, and language, (c) the complexities of cognition that underlie all of our daily interactions, and (d) ways to effectively apply cognitive psychological principles to the benefit of their own lives and the lives of those they interact with now and in the future.
Book of Mormon REL 121 2 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course is required for graduation. This course is a study of the content and teachings of the Book of Mormon, from 1st Nephi through Alma 29. Catalog years 2015 and forward may take FDREL 121 & FDREL 122 to fulfill the FDREL 275 requirement.
Book of Mormon REL 122 2 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course is required for graduation. This course is a study of the content and teachings of the Book of Mormon from Alma 30 through Moroni. Catalog years 2015 and forward may take FDREL 121 & FDREL 122 to fulfill the FDREL 275 requirement.
Missionary Preparation REL 130 2 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course is designed to help prepare students for missionary service by utilizing principles that reflect and supplement the emphasis taught in the "Preach My Gospel Manual" This course is highly recommended for all preparing to serve a mission.
The Eternal Family REL 200C 2 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
Required for graduation, this course centers on The Family: A Proclamation to the World and develops gospel doctrines and principles pertaining to a successful and happy marriage and family life. Practical skills required to achieve and sustain provident living will also be explored and practiced.
New Testament REL 211 2 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course is a study of the life and teachings of Jesus Christ as recorded in the four gospels.
New Testament REL 212 2 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course is a study of the early church and epistles from Acts through Revelation.
Foundations of the Restoration REL 225C 2 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course is required for graduation. In this course students will study key revelations, doctrine, people, and events related to the Restoration of the Church of Jesus Christ. As they do so, they will build upon their previous sequential and topical gospel study experiences. This course will provide the doctrinal foundation and historical context needed to gain an accurate understanding of Church doctrine and history. Students will study the scriptures, doctrine, and Church history in ways that relate to their lives and circumstances.
Jesus Christ Everlasting Gospel REL 250C 2 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course focuses on the eternal ministry of Jesus Christ and His divine roles and teachings throughout His premortal, mortal, and postmortal life. Special emphasis is given to the Savior's central role in Heavenly Father's plan for His children. Students are invited to deepen their love for and testimony of Jesus Christ and to become more devoted disciples. This course builds upon students' previous sequential and topical gospel study experiences and is taught using blocks of scripture in context from across the standard works as well as the teachings of modern prophets.
Introduction to Family History REL 261 2 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
In this course students will learn the doctrines surrounding family history and temple work. Skills associated with gathering, preserving, researching, and sharing family records, as well as doing temple work for ancestors will be introduced.
Teachings of Book of Mormon REL 275C 2 Materials required
This course is required for graduation. This course focuses on doctrine and themes found throughout the writings, teachings, and sermons of the Book of Mormon. Emphasis is given to prophetic witnesses of Heavenly Father and His Son, Jesus Christ. This course builds upon students? previous sequential and topical gospel study experiences. Both FDREL 121 and FDREL 122 can be taken to fulfill this requirement.
Old Testament REL 301 2 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course is a study of the Old Testament from Genesis through 2 Samuel, with an emphasis on doctrine and principles.
Old Testament REL 302 2 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course is a study of the Old Testament from The Kings through Malachi.
Doctrine and Covenants REL 324 2 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course is a study of the history, content, doctrine, and covenants found in sections 1 through 76 of the Doctrine and Covenants.
Doctrine and Covenants REL 325 2 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course is a study of the history, content, doctrine, and covenants in sections 77 through Official Declaration 2 of the Doctrine and Covenants.
Teachings of the Living Prophets REL 333 2 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course centers its emphasis on the role, function, and teachings of living prophets, seers, and revelators as building blocks of faith in a world of challenge and confusion.
Leisure in Society RM 304 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course is an introduction to the foundational theories, philosophies, concepts, and history of the Recreation Management profession. Topics include challenges associated with leisure, leisure values, and the impact leisure has on the individual, the family, and society.
Inclusion & Disabilities in TR RM 307 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course is designed as a professional foundations course in Inclusion and Disabilities in Therapeutic Recreation. The three primary goals of the course are to give the student (1) an understanding of diverse populations individuals and their disabilities; (2) an understanding of the role of recreation and leisure in the life of diverse populations; and (3) an introduction to the field of therapeutic recreation services. Students are required to obtain service hours for the course; it is highly recommended to register for RM 366 L, as this lab opportunity will help students obtain the required service hours. Students may obtain the alternate services hours through an approval process.
Therapeutic Recreation: Intro RM 370 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course is an introduction to the field of Therapeutic Recreation and clinical interventions for individuals with special needs or problems. Students will participate in an in-depth exploration of different impairments and the application of therapeutic recreation and is required for students emphasizing in Therapeutic Recreation and professionals who wish to work with individuals with special needs.
Therapeutic Rec: Evid Practice RM 371 3 Spring Semesters Only syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course identifies and explains definitions of therapeutic recreation and different therapeutic recreation practice models. Students will understand and apply interdisciplinary theories employed in therapeutic recreation programming and describe the process and procedures for developing specific programs. This is a required course for all students with an emphasis in Therapeutic Recreation.
Applied Therapeutic Recreation RM 373R 3 Materials required
This course is designed for Recreational Management majors who are emphasizing in Therapeutic Recreation to give students experience in the work force with those of special populations, as well as learning how to implement the TR Process, Assessment, Planning, Implementation, Evaluation, and discharge in diverse settings.
Thrp Rec: Adv of the Profession RM 473 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course presents the foundation for issues relating to professional competence, financial management, supervisory communication and management in the field of therapeutic recreation. This is a required course for all students with an emphasis in Therapeutic Recreation.
Operations Management SCM 361 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
(1) Improve spreadsheet modeling skills, (2) Improve file organization skills, and (3) Learn principles of operations management--how to effectively manage transformational processes that achieve delivery, cost, and quality objectives. Specific topics covered include process strategy, productivity, quality management, quality control, project management, forecasting, inventory management, production planning, material requirements planning, just-in-time and lean production, supply management and logistics management. Pursue these purposes using a variety of teaching techniques including readings, homework problems, qualitative and quantitative assessments, and in-class activities and simulations.
Intro to Social Media Marketing SMMBC105 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This introductory course will give you an overview of the evolution and purpose of Social Media and why it is a disruptive wave of innovation. In addition, you will learn how it affects your personal and professional life, including the importance of personal branding and how these principles can be applied in the professional world. You will learn about the history, purpose, anatomy, best practices, current trends, and pros & cons of the top eight social platforms: Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram, YouTube, LinkedIn, Google+, Snapchat, and blogs. In addition, this course will help you build foundational knowledge and professional skills on these nine social media platforms. You will learn how to research, use strategy and tactics, create engaging content, establish a following, and understand legal issues that confront social media. You will gain a high-level understanding of key marketing principles and strategies, as well as how companies use social media for marketing, analytics, customer service and more. You will have the opportunity to create a marketing campaign for an organization, pitch it, and effectively execute and evaluate it. You will also evaluate the future of social media for businesses and how it affects you personally and professionally. This course was developed with the subject matter expertise and oversight of the LDS Business College (LDSBC). See the Course Sharing Policy in this catalog.
Social Media Marketing Strategy SMMBC120 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
Social media channels, along with the way we use them, will continue to change. However, there are foundational marketing strategy principles that will consistently guide professionals in the ever-evolving world of social media marketing. In this course students will learn to establish a vision, set guiding and measurable social media marketing goals, identify and define target audiences, apply social media marketing tactics, and measure, analyze, and assess results. Comprehension and application of these principles will enable students to build an effective social media marketing strategy for brands and businesses that achieves business objectives. This course was developed with the subject matter expertise and oversight of the LDS Business College (LDSBC). See the Course Sharing Policy in this catalog.
Social Media Marketing Content SMMBC130 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course will teach you how to create high-quality content aimed at different social media platforms. Understanding how to create and produce great content for all of the various marketing channels will become one of your greatest skills. You will learn how to identify and create great content through copy, pictures, videos, infographics, etc. You will also learn the balance between content about yourself/your company vs. content about the customer's true needs and interests. In addition, this class will help you begin to learn the power of content-driven customer advocacy and how to drive measurable results. This course was developed with the subject matter expertise and oversight of the LDS Business College (LDSBC). See the Course Sharing Policy in this catalog.
SMM Analytics SMMBC150 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
Good data analysis can make or break a company. Data should drive innovation, pricing, resources, and even culture. In this course, you will learn how to capture the right data and then know what to do with it. You will learn how to use both free and paid tools to capture and analyze data from various online platforms. The value of data and analytics is that you are much better positioned to make the right decisions; this class will give you a life-long standout skill. This course was developed with the subject matter expertise and oversight of the LDS Business College (LDSBC). See the Course Sharing Policy in this catalog.
SMM Advocacy and Advertising SMMBC160 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
Large brands are shifting their advertising budgets towards digital and social media. In this course, you?ll learn what social media advertising is. You will create advertising content using Canva and create and analyze advertising campaigns on various social media marketing platforms, including Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, YouTube, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Snapchat. You will also engage in social listening using Hootsuite and identify effective brand advocacy methods. This course was developed with the subject matter expertise and oversight of the LDS Business College (LDSBC). See the Course Sharing Policy in this catalog.
Introduction to Sociology SOC 111 3 Materials required
This course focuses on the social and cultural foundations of human life. Its basic concepts enable the students to better appreciate how they and others are molded and shaped by society, and to understand the complexity of the social forces in their environment.
Sociology of the Family SOC 311 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course will help students understand how social forces influence American family life, including their own family experiences. Students will learn about the diversity of family arrangements in American society, and current/historical trends in dating, marriage, and childbearing.
Race and Ethnic Relations SOC 323 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course examines the historical social construction of race in the U.S., the development of racist practices by individuals and institutions and the consequences of those practices, especially the persistence of racial inequality. We will examine U.S. racial/ethnic groups, including whites, as well as the intersections of race with other inequalities such as class and gender.
Crime & Delinquency SOC 383 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course is a study of the nature and causes of various forms of illegal behavior for adults and juveniles. We will examine the causation, treatment, prevention, and outlook of crime and status offenses using theories of deviance. The course will overview the major sociological explanations and theories of delinquency, criminality, and victimization as well as a few of the major biological and psychological explanations. The course will conclude with a brief overview of the differences between the adult and juvenile justice system as well as policy implications for adult and juvenile crime prevention.
Beginning Spanish I SPAN 101 4 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course is for beginners with less than two years of high school Spanish. Emphasis is on basic language skills of listening speaking, reading, and writing. Not appropriate for Spanish-speaking returned missionaries.
Beginning Spanish II SPAN 102 4 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
In this course emphasis is on basic language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Not appropriate for Spanish-speaking returned missionaries.
Read in Hispanic Lit Adv Speaker SPAN 302 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course involves Spanish language reading combined with a review of key grammar concepts. Entry level for returned missionaries and similarly advanced non-natives who learned Spanish outside of the classroom.
Exceptional Students: P-Grade 6 SPED 310 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course will emphasize the types and developmental patterns of specific exceptionalities (including giftedness and poverty), addressing risk factors, etiology, characteristics, and classification of common disabilities. Focus will also be on legal issues, parent/student rights, responsibilities of teachers, both general education and special education, quality teaching for ALL students, including intervention strategies, accommodations, and the use of community resources to meet children's individual needs. Child maltreatment, including legal requirements, is introduced.
Diverse & Exceptional Students SPED 360 2 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
The course will cover the basics of diversity and special education issues with which a typical P-12 teacher will be expected to be familiar. The student will learn how to differentiate instruction, and employ essential strategies, based on a student?s exceptional needs and background. The student will also become familiar with laws and policies governing a teacher?s engagement with diverse and exceptional students in the public schools.
Introduction to Social Work SW 260 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course covers Social Welfare as a social institution and the emergence of social work as a profession. An overview of historical underpinnings to develop social work knowledge, historically grounded purposes, and fundamental values and ethics for generalist practice will be addressed.
Child Welfare Services SW 463 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course is planned and organized to acquaint students with the role of the generalist social work practitioner in the field of child welfare. An overview of public and private programs that provide services to children is provided. These services include counseling, adoptions, foster care, residential care, school-based services, home-based services, court services, and daycare services. Also addressed are social problems that impact children, particularly those who are disadvantaged because of disability, racism, sexism and poverty.
Introduction to Theatre TA 115 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course will introduce students to the diverse world of theatre and increase their understanding, appreciation, and critical perceptions of this art form. Primary focus will be on the fundamentals of theatrical production, as well as an exploration of its historical and philosophical background. Theatre is a collaborative and participatory discipline and art so a major emphasis of this class is participation and experience-based learning.
Dramatic Structure and Analysis TA 116 2 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course studies the fundamentals of play analysis and dramatic theory. Students will learn to critically analyze a script to uncover how identified elements and aspects work together to support and strengthen its message. This will be accomplished through class demonstration and discussion, class exercise, small group activities, play reading, and through attending live performances. It is recommended to be completed during the first year of study.
Theatre History I TA 401 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
The first half of theatre history: the origins of theatre, Greek, Roman, Medieval, Italian Renaissance, Spanish, Elizabethan and Asian. An exploration of how the times and places listed have made theatre what it is today.
Theatre History II TA 402 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
The second half of theatre history: Renaissance and Baroque, French and Italian, English 1642-1800, 18th-Century European and American, Romanticism, Realism, Contemporary, and Postmodern Theatre. This course covers the development of theatre after Shakespeare's day to the present, discussing the arrival of new styles, showing the influence all of these time periods and how the people involved have shaped the theatre we know today. The elements we will examine include playwriting, acting, directing, design and architecture, as well as historical and philosophical movements. Theatre theory will also be introduced for each period of theatre.
Introduction to TESOL TESOL101 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
In this introduction to the TESOL Certificate, student will learn the essential theories and practice basic principles of teaching English as a foreign language. The course will cover topics related to language teaching methods and approaches, principles of language acquisition, four-skill instruction, and curriculum design and materials evaluation.
TESOL Pedagogy I TESOL102 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This is the first of two courses on EFL teaching methodology. This course emphasizes benefits of foreign language learning, language acquisition theory, Communicative Language Teaching, major and minor teaching methodologies, and teaching speaking, listening, reading, writing, and culture.
TESOL Pedagogy II TESOL103 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
The second of two courses on EFL teaching methodology. This course emphasizes (1) technology, (2) cross-cultural differences, (3) classroom management, and (4) assessment.
English Grammar for TESOL TESOL104 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
A detailed study of English from the perspective of those who will teach it to speakers of other languages. Emphasis will be on helping students make sense of grammar so they can help others improve their English skills. The principles and methodologies for best internalizing language knowledge will also be considered.
TESOL Practice TESOL105 1 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
In this course, students will review basic principles of language acquisition and language pedagogy. Students will also complete a variety of assignments as they teach English Language Learners during the semester.
Web Fundamentals WDD 130 2 Materials required
This course introduces students to the World Wide Web and to careers in web site design and development. The course is hands on with students actually participating in simple web designs and programming. It is anticipated that students who complete this course will understand the fields of web design and development and will have a good idea if they want to pursue this degree as a major.
Web Frontend Development I WDD 230 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course focuses on the planning and development of web sites using HTML, CSS, JavaScript and PHP with attention to usability principles.
Web Frontend Development II WDD 330 3 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
WDD 330 will continue with the topics presented in WDD 230 Web Front-end Development I: Building websites with HTML, CSS and Javascript. This course will have a stronger emphasis on Javascript development and mobile design as students create mobile web applications.
Advanced CSS WDD 331 2 syllabus Syllabus Materials required
This course provides deeper learning into topics in cascading style sheets (CSS). Topics of study will include: complex CSS selectors, advanced CSS layout and positioning techniques, CSS transitions and animations, CSS Preprocessing, an introduction to CSS libraries, and using scalable vector graphics (SVG) with HTML and CSS.
Web Full-Stack Development WDD 430 3 Materials required
This course will teach you how to design and build interactive web based applications using HTML, CSS, JavaScript, and a web development stack.
Capstone WDD 499 2 Materials required
Senior students will work closely with a professional mentor, faculty advisor, and/or peers to develop a project that demonstrates the fusion of their undergraduate coursework and experiences. This project should allow them to showcase what they have learned, as well as learn more about a topic that they would like to master, but did not have the opportunity to do so during their coursework.

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This Course List is meant to provide students with general information regarding available online courses. For the most accurate information students should refer to the actual course scheduling information during registration each semester.

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