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Plagiarism

Intentional plagiarism is the deliberate act of representing the words, ideas, or data of another as one’s own without providing proper attribution to the original author through quotation, reference, or footnote.

Inadvertent plagiarism involves the inappropriate, but non-deliberate, use of another’s words, ideas, or data without proper attribution. Although not a violation of the Honor Code, it is a form of academic misconduct for which an instructor can impose appropriate academic sanctions. Students who are in doubt as to whether they are providing proper attribution have the responsibility to consult with their instructor and obtain guidance.

Plagiarism may occur with respect to unpublished as well as published material. Examples include:

  • Direct Plagiarism: the verbatim copying of an original source without acknowledging the source
  • Paraphrased Plagiarism: the paraphrasing of ideas from another without attribution, causing a reader to mistake these ideas for the writer’s own
  • Plagiarism Mosaic: the borrowing of words, ideas, or data from an original source and blending this original material with one’s own writing, without acknowledging the source
  • Insufficient Acknowledgment: the partial or incomplete attribution of words, ideas, or data from an original source

Fabrication/Falsification

Fabrication or falsification occurs when a student invents or distorts the origin or content of information used as authority. Examples include:

  • Citing a source that does not exist
  • Citing information from a source that is not included in the source for which credit is given
  • Citing a source for a secondary proposition that it does not support
  • Citing a bibliography source when it was neither consulted nor cited in the body of the paper
  • Intentionally distorting the meaning or applicability of data
  • Inventing data or statistical results to support conclusions

Cheating

A student cheats when he or she attempts to give the appearance of a level of knowledge or skill that has not been obtained. Examples include:

  • Copying from another person’s work during an examination or while completing an assignment
  • Allowing someone to copy work that is not his or her own during an examination or while completing an assignment
  • Using unauthorized materials during an examination or while completing an assignment
  • Collaborating on an examination or assignment without authorization
  • Taking an examination or completing an assignment for another, or permitting another to take an examination or to complete an assignment that is not his or her own

Other Academic Misconduct

Other academic misconduct includes other academically dishonest, deceitful, or inappropriate acts which are intentionally committed. Examples include:

  • Inappropriately providing or receiving information or academic work so as to gain unfair advantage over others
  • Planning with another to commit any act of academic dishonesty
  • Attempting to gain an unfair academic advantage for oneself or another by bribery or by any act of offering, giving, receiving, or soliciting anything of value to another for such purpose
  • Changing or altering grades or other official educational records
  • Obtaining or providing to another a test or answers to a test that has not been administered
  • Breaking and entering into a building or office for the purpose of obtaining unauthorized materials
  • Continuing work on an examination or assignment after the allocated time has elapsed
  • Submitting the same work for more than one class without disclosure and approval
  • Getting equal credit on group assignments when equal work was not done

Procedures for Handling Academic Misconduct

Instructors are responsible to establish and communicate to students their expectations of behavior with respect to academic honesty and conduct in the course. The instructor will be responsible to investigate any incident of academic dishonesty or misconduct, determine the circumstances, and take appropriate action. Examples of appropriate action include but are not limited to the following:

  • Reprimanding the student orally or in writing
  • Requiring work affected by the academic dishonesty to be redone
  • Administering a lower or failing grade on the affected assignment, test, or course

Refer student to the Student Honor Office. The Student Honor Office will complete an independent investigation and take appropriate action. If the incident involves violation of a public law, e.g., breaking and entering into an office or stealing an examination, the act should be reported to University Security.

Both suspected and proven violations of the Academic Honesty Policy should be reported to the Student Honor Office, detailing the name, incident, and action taken. If the occurrence is sufficiently egregious, or if a pattern of dishonesty or misconduct is discovered, the Student Honor Office may take additional action, based upon the nature of the violation.

If a student disagrees with the determination or action and is unable to resolve the matter to the mutual satisfaction of the student and the instructor, he or she may have it reviewed through the university’s grievance process (See Student Academic Grievance Policy).