${Value}

"One thing I like to tell parents is, if you're not talking about to your teenagers about pornography, you're missing out...pornography breeds in silence and secrecy," Utah State Senator Todd Weiler told BYU-Idaho Radio.

November 9, 2017
Writer: Sydney Jensen

A Utah State senator visited with community leaders and residents in Rexburg Wednesday, November 8.

Utah Senator Todd Weiler shared his experiences with battling the pornography industry, one of which came just last year and shoved Weiler into the national spotlight. 

In 2016, the Utah state legislature voted to pass a resolution declaring pornography to be a public health crisis. State senator Todd Weiler spearheaded the initiative and the resolution quickly gained national attention.

Weiler says pornography is much like tobacco or drugs and his first priority is to protect children who may find themselves exposed to pornography.

"One thing I like to tell parents is, if you're not talking about to your teenagers about pornography, you're missing out...pornography breeds in silence and secrecy," Utah State Senator Todd Weiler told BYU-Idaho Radio. 

Which is why a southeast Idaho group called Citizens for Decency invited leaders in the community to a special educational session with the senator, in hopes that some of the area's leaders could glean some tips and ideas about commencing the same battle in Idaho. 

"[We had Senator Weiler come so he] could speak to them about steps that he's taken to make pornography a public health crisis in hopes of maybe furthering that legislation in Idaho," C.J. Krainock, who works with Citizens for Decency told BYU-Idaho Radio.

While people like Weiler and who attended the executive educational event last night are working to combat the poison of pornography, it's millennials like Krainock who seem to be spearheading an issue that's plaguing his generation.

"I know that that's a problem in our generation because of our access through our phones through the internet and just the instant access we have to pornography all the time," Krainock said.

You can listen to the full interview below.