If you see houses being uprooted and shuttled down the road, don't worry, it's just a quick move.

May 7, 2018
Writer: Myles Primm

Well, it’s that time of the year again...the move in process.

This has been anticipated and often causes traffic with the sudden increase in population. But there is also something else that might be slowing the roads...houses.

OK, so there obviously aren’t houses permanently in the middle of the roads…but if you’re on the corner of main and north fifth west you’ll see some houses on giant beams...

T-N-T Moving isn’t your standard u-haul company, they are moving the physical house. They are moving for the expansion of the homestead assisted living.

Tim Olsen who is the manager of T-N-T Moving explains where the houses are going and don’t worry, no one's getting evicted.

“One’s going to Ashton, St. Anthony and then one down to Rigby,” Olsen said. “I believe the developers owned most of the houses for the last several years. So they were rentals, about almost all of them.”

The process is complicated. In short, holes are cut through the bottom of the houses and metal beams which look like train tracks are placed through those holes. Then there are wooden panels set perpendicular to the metal ones to stabilize it. These are set over hydraulic lifts slowly lift the house three feet so they can load it on the truck.

It doesn’t happen in one fell swoop. The process of stabilizing takes time. When you are looking at the homes suspended in the air or sitting on the back of the trucks, you can see the inside of the house. I guess it’s just human nature to be attracted to the nostalgia that glows from the hollow living rooms where, if you stand still enough, you can still see the tv hanging on the wall and the couches. The faded paint in what looks like it would be a child's room with faded wallpaper panels of tropical fish and sky blue paint on the walls. The kitchen is bare but there are still echoes of microwave ovens humming, something being sizzling on the oven and families discussing their days at a dinner table. The light fixtures look over empty rooms they once illuminated.

For these specific houses, the feeling will remain as T-N-T will move it for a new family to occupy it and create their own memories.

I spoke with Dave Thueson, owner of the Homestead Living Centers over the phone and he explained these cottage are part of a phase 2 expansion process they are working with.

“These are for people 55 and up who don’t need assisted living but don’t want to have to worry about taking out the trash or taking care of the house or yard.”

The Cottages are 2 bedrooms with all the amenities including access to the perks of the homestead building. They anticipate these homes to be finished by the end of December of this year.