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"Records allow us to do other important things like for example, develop gratitude," Shawn Johansen, Chair of the History, Geography and Political Science Department at BYU-Idaho told BYU-Idaho Radio. "They help us to see blessings the Lord has given to us...in addition to gratitude...they help us improve. Journals, if they're done correctly...help us be self-evaluative."

October 31, 2017
Writer: Sydney Jensen

Brother Shawn Johansen, Chair of the History, Geography and Political Science Department at BYU-Idaho, taught students and faculty about the value of spiritual records in his devotional Tuesday, October 31.

"Records allow us to do other important things like for example, develop gratitude," Shawn Johansen, Chair of the History, Geography and Political Science Department at BYU-Idaho told BYU-Idaho Radio. "They help us to see blessings the Lord has given to us...in addition to gratitude...they help us improve. Journals, if they're done correctly...help us be self-evaluative." 

Apostles and prophets, Johansen says, have continually counseled people to keep records of both their daily activities, but more importantly of their spiritual impressions and experiences. 

"Those who keep a book of remembrance are more likely to keep the Lord in remembrance," Johansen said in his devotional quoting President Spencer W. Kimball. "Journals are a way of counting our blessings and of leaving an inventory of these blessings for our posterity."

Ultimately, Johansen says the benefits of keeping a record outweighs the feelings of inadequacy or lack of desire. 

"Even if you don't feel that a daily journal is for you, consider recording your spiritual experiences," Johansen said. "I testify that it will bring blessings."

You can listen to Johansen's full interview and devotional below.