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Math 100L: Lesson 4

Flashcard Vocabulary

  • definitely (adv)
  • outcome (n)
  • area (n)
  • volume (n)
  • dimesion (n)
  • project (n)

Helpful Vocabulary

  • knee-high to a grasshopper tall (idiom)
  • shorthand (n)
  • cool (adj)
  • parenthesis (n; pl “parentheses”)
  • inadvertent (adj)
  • to kid (v)
  • to hurt (v)
  • to earn (v)
  • exponential (adj)
  • to stick (v)
  • foolish (adj)
  • to devour (v)
  • to compete (v)
  • china cabinet (n)
  • to consume (v)
  • to spoil (v)
  • pleasure (n)
  • operation (n)
  • insurance (n)
  • to spend (v)
  • to survive (v)
  • madman/madwoman (n)
  • virtually (adv)
  • creditor (n)
  • a bill (n)
  • advertiser (n)
  • marketing (v)
  • lousy (adj)
  • sophisticated (adj)
  • to harness (v)
  • reunion (n)

Speaking Partner Appointment: Interjections; Exponents

Youg adults painting the side of a building

Math 100L Lesson 4 PDF

Read the following information to your Speaking Partner:

Interjections are sound combinations that have specific meanings in spoken English. They are not real words, so usually they are not written. Here are some very common interjections:

Interjection and Meaning:

Uh-huh = Yes
Uh-uh = No
Uh-oh = I made a mistake / There’s a problem
Huh? = What?
Oops = I made a mistake
Aha = I understand now
Uh … / Hmm … = I’m thinking / I’m not sure

Discussion Questions

  1. Are these interjections similar to sounds used in your own language to express meaning?
  2. Which of these sounds have you heard from the video lectures by Brother Baird?
  3. Using the interjections above, discuss your experience taking the math exam last week.
    • How did you do on the exam?
    • Was it difficult for you?
    • Did the Visual Charts help you to remember important points?
  4. Share an experience in which the “Aha” interjection makes sense.

Pronunciation Practice

Practice saying the following numbers in English. Your speaking partner can help you with any you are not sure how to pronounce.

  • 104 = 10,000
  • 108 = 100,000,000
  • 103 = 1,000
  • 74 = 7 x 7 x 7 x 7
  • 49 = 7 x 7
  • 343 x 7
  • 2,401
  • 234
  • 8,796
  • 34.01
  • 43.2

Mixed Fractions

  • 5 2/5
  • 8 6/13
  • 2 5/8
  • 7 1/6

Improper Fractions

  • 32/4
  • 78/9
  • 28/7
  • 21/3

Can vs. Can’t

To hear the difference between can and can’t, listen to the differences in the “a” sound and the stress on the verbs next to “can” and “can’t.” Listen to your speaking partner say the following sentences:

  • You can place the minus sign here. (Pronounce: kin place + stress on place)
  • You can’t place the minus sign here. (Pronounce: kant place + stress on can’t place)

Now you will practice saying the following sentences. First read the sentence, then say the sentence without looking at the sentence.

  • Maria can lend you more money.
  • Maria can’t lend you more money.
  • I can put 100 pesos a month into a savings account.
  • I can’t put 100 pesos a month into a savings account.

Look at the following list of activities. Which ones can you do? Which ones can’t you do? Take turns with your speaking partner, making true sentences with can and can’t.

  • play the piano
  • run a mile
  • dance
  • sing
  • swim
  • iron a shirt
  • speak French
  • play soccer
  • sew a button on a shirt
  • bake a cake
  • make bread
  • use a calculator