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Math 100L: Lesson 12

Flashcard Vocabulary

  • convenient (adj)
  • caution (n)
  • probably (adv)

Helpful Vocabulary

  • coefficient (n)
  • to figure out (v)
  • vice versa (adv)
  • cinch (n)
  • vast majority
  • shallow (adj)
  • to bet (v)
  • to handle (v)
  • extra (adj)
  • to apologize (v)
  • to let someone loose
  • entire (adj)
  • to skip (v)
  • integer (n)

Speaking Partner Visit: Graphing Equations with Slope

Read the following information to your Speaking Partner:

As you learn English, you will find yourself in conversations with others. There are many common phrases in English that will help you with your speaking skills.

Hesitating and Taking Time to Think

  • Hmm …
  • That's a good question.
  • Well …
  • Let’s see …
  • Let me think.
  • It depends.

Requesting Help

  • Could you help me, please?
  • Can you please help me _____ ?
  • Will you help me _____ ?
  • Would you please help me _____ ?
  • Would you mind _____ ?
  • Would you mind helping me?
  • Could you possibly help me out here?

Expressing Thanks

  • Thanks.
  • Thank you.
  • Thanks a lot.
  • Thank you very much.
  • I appreciate it.
  • Thanks for your time.
  • I appreciate your help.
  • I appreciate your kindness.
  • You’ve been very helpful.
  • That was really nice of you.

Responding to Thanks

  • You’re welcome.
  • No problem.
  • Glad to do it.
  • Don’t mention it.
  • It’s my pleasure.
  • It was nothing.
  • Any time.

Apologizing

  • I’m sorry.
  • I’m very sorry.
  • I’m terribly sorry.
  • Excuse me.
  • Pardon me.
  • I apologize.
  • My apologies.

Discussion Questions

  1. Which of these phrases are the most common?
  2. Which phrases does your speaking partner use most often?
  3. Which ones are you most comfortable with?
  4. Share an experience in which you expressed thanks to someone in English. How did that person respond?
  5. Share an experience in which someone thanked you for doing something in English. How did you respond?
  6. What is your favorite phrase for responding to thanks?
  7. What is your speaking partner’s favorite phrase for apologizing?

Pronunciation Practice

English Pronunciation: Beginning consonant clusters

Groups of consonants—or “consonant clusters”—must be pronounced closely together. Do not separate them with a vowel sound. Listen to your Speaking Partner say the following words. Then repeat the words.

Consonant ClusterConsonant + Vowel
trade tirade
prayed parade
bloom balloon
claps collapse
sport support
plight polite
please peas

Listen to your Speaking Partner say the following consonant cluster words. Then repeat the words:

Clusters that begin with the letter “s”

  1. swim
  2. score
  3. skin
  4. small
  5. stay
  6. snake
  7. snail
  8. strong
  9. slow
  10. sweater

Clusters with the “r” or “l” sound as the second letter

  1. blink
  2. free
  3. grow
  4. cram
  5. blend
  6. plow
  7. train
  8. fly
  9. climb
  10. cry

Clusters with “w” as the second letter

  1. twelve
  2. twin
  3. swim
  4. swing
  5. swamp

Clusters with three consonants

  1. string
  2. sphere
  3. splendid
  4. through
  5. strap
  6. straw
  7. throw
  8. spray
  9. scrub
  10. school

Do the following activities with your Speaking Partner.

  1. Choose three words from those listed above. Ask your Speaking Partner a question using those three words. Do this back and forth so that you have each asked and answered five questions.
  2. Practice your pronunciation by repeating the following phrases several times:
    • We prayed the parade would proceed as planned.
    • The estate taxes are higher than the state taxes.
    • Sharon swims slowly through the swampy crossing.

Practice saying the following numbers:

  • (5, 2) (5, 6)
  • –4x + 7y = 19
  • 5x – 8y = –33
  • x + 8y = 46
  • y = 3x + 8
  • $350.00
  • $89.06
  • $199.98
  • $2,712.25
  • $ .32
  • $1.04
  • 463.002
  • 54
  • 12,345
  • 43,565,867

Years

  • 2018
  • 1996
  • 2001
  • 1884
  • 1776
  • 2012