Tina Dyches, associate professor and graduate coordinator at BYU, urged students to care for the poor and the needy at Tuesday’s devotional at BYU-Idaho.

June 16, 2010
Writer: Writer: Tori Bowman

Tina Dyches, associate professor and graduate coordinator at Brigham Young University, urged students to care for the poor and the needy at Tuesday's devotional at Brigham Young University-Idaho.


"There are so many in the world who have burdens much heavier than ours: who mourn and are in need of comfort; who are poor not just economically, but educationally, emotionally, physically, socially, or spiritually," Dyches said.


She encouraged students to think of others before themselves. "Imagine waking up each morning and not thinking about ourselves first," she said. "What would it be like if instead we thought of someone who was in need of our assistance, then let those thoughts of charity guide us to serve others throughout the remainder of the day?"


Dyches went on to talk about the difference between caring about others and caring for others. "I believe we can care about others who are in unfavorable circumstances without being moved to action," she said. "We feel sorry for them. We may even pray for them to be comforted. However, when we care for others, we put forth effort. This effort, with love and compassion, can begin a cycle of caring that lifts those who are needy so they can be in a position to care for others."


Dyches invited students to think of what they can give, asking, "Are any of us too poor, too uneducated, too destitute, too disabled, or too young to give? Did not the widow give more than the wealthy when she cast in the treasury her two mites?" Everyone can give something, she said.


She concluded by urging students to reframe their daily activities so that they lead to service. "As you sit through a lecture, read a chapter, take a test, do your job, or engage in other activities, ask yourself, ‘How can this experience help me to serve the Lord and His children better? How can my education here at BYU-Idaho benefit others besides myself?' Your life will have so much more meaning and you will experience so much more joy as you direct your personal efforts outward."