Brown Bag Discussions offer faculty an opportunity to share lunch together and listen to their colleagues speak about topics related to learning and teaching. Come get a free lunch and experience interactive discussions presented by your friends. Faculty presenters have the freedom to speak about things they feel are innovative and enlightening, items they find successful in the classroom and best practices. Instructors who regularly participate in Brown Bag Discussions often come away with new ideas that make their teaching more meaningful.

Listed below are the upcoming Brown Bag / PIE Talk Discussions. To reserve a seat and a lunch, RSVP to instructionaldevelopment@byui.edu.

Brown bag discussions image

Upcoming Discussions:

--------------------------------------------------------------------------

PIE Talk: (Passion, Innovation, and Enlightenment)

Thursday, November 15, from 1-2 pm, MC 387 Special Events Room

Friday November 16, from 11:30 am to 12:30 pm, MC 387 Special Events Room

FEATURING:

MATT MILES, History, Geography and Political Science

Religious Identities, Political Identities, and Anti-Atheist Bias in the United States.

While religious Americans may be among the most charitable, trusting, civically-engaged, and tolerant, they are also the most distrusting of Atheists. To the extent that existing explanations acknowledge the role of social identities in tolerance, they do not specify how religious social identities motivate negative attitudes toward non-religious Americans.  In this presentation, Matt presents the findinga from several surveys of the US population and one smaller study of active, less active, and former members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, which isolate the influence of religious and political identities on anti-atheist attitudes in the United States.

REESE NELSON, Applied Plant Science

Human Beings and the Environment

Human beings have an innate need to interact with nature, and prefer natual over built environments, when given a choice. Yet, for the first time in our history, the majority of the world's population live in cities.  If there's one concept that has distilled deep into his soul over the years, it is that "environment matters". The need for plants, trees and engaging green spaces in the places where we live, work and go to school has never been greater.  Let's learn together, the many benefits of nature.

For additional information, please contact Shirley Hawkes at 496-1157 or hawkess@byui.edu.

Off-Campus Training