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BYU-Idaho Seismograph Network

 

STATION NAME GEOGRAPHIC LOCATION LONGITUDE LATITUDE
CMI Centenial Mountains. Idaho near the Montana border. -111.62 44.52
IMW Indian Meadows area. Teton mountains, Wyoming. -110.94 43.90
RRI Red Ridge Mountain, Idaho. South of the Snake River, downstream of Palisades Reservoir. -111.32 43.36

Seismic station map

 

 

 

Working together with the United States Geological Survey, and with help from Montana Tech and the University of Utah our system was upgraded to include Earthworm during the summer of 2000. Montana Tech now includes the BYU-Idaho stations on their Internet site. To see current recordings of our seismic stations go to Montana Tech's earthquake site. The BYU-Idaho stations are located at the bottom of the page showing all of the different sites available for viewing through Montana Tech's web site.

 

Click on the link below for a Google Earth file containing placemarks of all known earthquakes in and adjacent to Idaho since 1960 (Compiled by Robert Clayton):

 

Google Earth KMZ file of Idaho-related earthquakes

 

Google Earth KMZ file of recent earthquakes recorded by the BYU-I Seismic Network

 

 

Click on a quake symbol and the date, depth, and magnitude will pop up.  The Borah Peak quake symbol is larger than all others.

 

 

 

A little history of seismology and the BYU-Idaho Geology Department:

 

"During these early years [early 1970s], we we were able to build a seismograph. With one station, we worked with the Idaho National Lab as they had several stations, to locate events in the area around Eastern Idaho. As the Teton Dam was being built, the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR) approached us to see if we would take care of three stations that would monitor earthquake activity in the area around the Dam. After the Teton Dam failed, we expected the BOR to dismantle the network. We proposed that the network be expanded to include stations near Island Park Dam, Jackson Dam, and Palisades Dam. The United States Geologic Survey (USGS) added computers and the Earthworm program in the late 1990s. The network gradually grew to be a major part in monitoring the seismic events in the Intermountain West. It is great to see humble beginnings grow to be a major contributor to the scientific community."

-Ed Williams

 

Other favorite links for Seismic information:


University of Utah
United States Geological Survey
IRIS (Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology)
California (USGS)
University of Washington Geophysics Program