Outcomes

Section II: Outcomes and Assessment

Part A: OUTCOMES

Foundations Program Outcomes

1. Students will learn how to Learn.

    1. Discover knowledge across a variety of media.
    2. Test hypotheses by collecting, analyzing, and interpreting data.
    3. Identify key assumptions and theories in oral and written sources.
    4. Experience the arts both cognitively and affectively.
    5. Search the scriptures as a source of gospel instruction.

2. Students will learn how to think.

    1. Identify reliable sources of information.
    2. Apply quantitative reasoning skills to inform their decisions.
    3. Use empirical evidence to shape their ideas and opinions.
    4. Articulate the responsibilities that come with freedom.
    5. Enrich their understanding of other times and cultures with knowledge and empathy.
    6. Shape their life, including their intellectual and professional pursuits, with their faith.

3. Students will learn how to communicate.

    1. Express ideas with clear, engaging, and confident speech.
    2. Express ideas in clear and effective writing. 
    3. Work with groups across disciplines to solve problems.
    4. Articulate value assessments about quality in the arts.
    5. Express creativity across a variety of media.
    6. Act as informed citizens in their congregation, community, nation, and world.

Faculty outcomes for the Foundations program are as follows:

  • Faculty will implement the principles and processes of the BYU-Idaho Learning Model.
  • Faculty will work with colleagues across disciplines, colleges, and departments.
  • Faculty will create significant learning and teaching experiences by working in teaching teams and participating in a culture of mutual peer observation.
  • Faculty will have experience significant personal and professional development as a result of the cross-disciplinary nature of Foundations.

All Foundations courses share the following common practices (Foundations Learning Environment):

  • Foundations courses are carefully focused to provide opportunities for students to engage deeply in the subject matter.
  • All courses are cross-disciplinary.
  • All courses fully implement the BYU-Idaho Learning Model.
  • All courses are taught by teams who collaborate in the development and delivery of course material. 
  • All sections of a course share a common syllabus, outcomes, and assessment measures. 
  • Teaching teams meet often to discuss curriculum and teaching techniques

Foundations Course Outcomes

FDAMF 101 American Foundations

·         Be able to explain the basic principles, truths, and history of American political and economic institutions (including agency, rights, rule of law, constitutionalism, the War for Independence, the U.S. Constitution, religion in America, civil rights, women's suffrage, immigration, market economics, Keynesianism, monetarism, the Great Depression, technology, and foreign relations).

·         Be able to converse knowledgeably and respectfully on public issues, apply social theories and correct principles to contemporary situations, and appreciate and defend the universal principles of the American Founding

·         Become effective disciple leaders and informed citizens of their countries

 

FDCIV 101 ~ Foundations of Civil Society

·         Analyze philosophical, ideological, and policy differences in political, economic, or social systems by identifying the advantages and values, as well as the vulnerabilities and flaws, of all sides.

·         Engage differences of opinion between citizens with clarity, charity, and respect while seeking common ground, explaining important personal convictions, accurately restating other perspectives, and achieving pragmatic solutions where possible.

·         Analyze the strengths and weaknesses of various governmental and economic systems by identifying elements which may have a positive or negative effect upon freedom, order, prosperity, and/or security.

·         Explain the philosophical origins and arguments of liberalism, democracy, capitalism, and socialism as well as the effects of war, poverty, inequality, civil disobedience, and revolution.

·         Identify responsibilities and opportunities for meaningful engagement in their respective local, regional, national, and global communities.

 

FDHUM 110 Foundations of Humanities/ FDCA 101

1.      Identify key works of Western art, architecture, literature and music within their cultural and historical contexts.

2.      Understand and identify the formal elements of the visual arts, literature, theatre, cinema and music.

3.      Apply principles of the creative process in their own creative work and in analyzing cultural events.

4.      Apply basic cognitive and analytical tools to make value assessments about quality in the arts.

FDHUM 214 Modern Arts and Propaganda/ FDCA 204

1.      Understand how knowledge of the humanities can enrich their lives life and help them become thinking, intelligent people. Becoming familiar with cognitive learning that is not always fact-based can expand understanding of the human experience, as well as increase empathy and spirituality.

2.      Appreciate that the humanities are a manifestation of the times--specifically, how the arts reveal much about history, culture, religion, and ideology.   Be able to identify and describe a variety of modern art forms and genres in the arts and letters, placing various artworks in cultural and historical context.

3.      Acquire the tools needed to help evaluate the meanings, messages, quality, and agendas found in the arts and propaganda.  Identify the uses, characteristics, and value of propaganda and persuasion, both good and bad.  Develop the ability to analyze institutional, cultural, and personal bias. 

4.      Become familiar with major composers, artists, writers, movements, cultures, and historical events in Western and non-Western cultures, including their concerns, issues, arts, ideas, religion, and values as manifest through the humanities.    

5.      Develop the tools to make value assessments about quality in the arts, and be confident in finding and expressing opinions by studying the subject matter.

 

FDHUM 299 Topics in Humanities

Outcomes will vary with the topic.

FDINT211 Global Hotspot: Pakistan/ FDCA 201

·         Analyze how factors such as history, geography, economics, religion, natural resources, and language shape nations;

·         Acquire the skills to analyze current challenges facing this volatile nation with ancient roots;

·         Be able to use these same analytical skills to better understand any nation or region of the world both from the U.S.'s perspective and the country's own perspective;

·         Develop an interest in international affairs and appreciate how the nations of the world are connected-and why understanding such matters is important from a gospel perspective; and

·         Be able to identify and appreciate the strengths and weaknesses in other cultures and nations.

           

FDINT 212 The Developing World/FDCA 202

·         The purpose of this course is to develop research and critical thinking skills needed to independently learn about and understand the nations of the world. Emphasis will be given to analyzing issues such as geography, natural resources, history, culture, economics, poverty, education, politics, government, environmental sustainability, and other issues related to a basic understanding of the complexities of the vast majority of the world's population.

 

FDINT 213 The Middle East/FDCA 203

1.      Demonstrate general factual knowledge of the geography, history, politics, culture, religion, and societies of the Middle East;

2.      Analyze and interpret specific Middle Eastern issues from economic, political, geographic, and other perspectives;

3.      Locate and engage appropriate research materials, and construct effective arguments on Middle Eastern topics; and   

4.      Develop sensitivity for cultural differences that will foster prudence and good judgment in international affairs and in daily life.

FDINT 215 China/ FDCA 205

The purpose of this course is to develop the skills needed to independently learn about and understand the nations of the world.

With China as a giant case study, students will:

a)      Analyze the impact of history, geography, economics, religion, politics, culture and language on nations;

b)      Analyze challenges involving this dynamic nation with ancient roots;

c)      Better understand the growing importance of China in international affairs; and

d)      Use these analytical skills to better understand any nation or region of the world.

 

FDINT 299 Topics in International Issues

Outcomes will vary with the topic.

 

FDLIT 216 Great Books of the World/ FDCA 206

1.      Acquire knowledge and wisdom from a deep reading of 5 Great Books

2.      Come to a better understanding of what constitutes a Great Book

3.      Keep a Reading Journal on 5 Great Books we read for this class

4.      Come to class every day prepared to discuss and analyze these Great Books

5.      Come to understand and appreciate how reading Great Books may improve and enrich our lives

FDLIT 299 Writing & Reasoning Foundations/FDENG 101

Outcomes will vary with the topic.

 FDENG 101 Writing and Reasoning Foundations

1.      Demonstrate their desire and ability to learn and improve in a higher education environment.

2.      Explain and practice the writing process, and gain a basic understanding of grammar and mechanics.

3.      Produce quality, academic, informative and argumentative writing and explain what makes it effective, including at least twenty pages of reviewed and edited writing and at least twenty pages of instructor-assessed writing.

4.      Develop critical reading, thinking and writing skills, including annotation, analysis, synthesis, and argumentation skills.

5.      Develop effective research, source integration, documentation, and presentation skills.

 

FDENG 301 Outcomes

1.      Apply critical reading and thinking skills to texts, including the ability to accurately summarize and analyze their structure and logic.

2.      Conduct library and electronic research by locating reliable sources with which to frame an argument relevant to a current academic or disciplinary conversation.

3.      Write a coherent, clear, and cogent argument that supports claims with specific evidence, logical reasoning, and appropriate documentation.

4.      Meet the needs of a variety of audiences and rhetorical situations.

FDENG 301

1.      Write a narrowly focused, disciplinary research paper that includes elements of persuasion and argumentation and that enables them to contribute to the conversation in their disciplines.

2.      Produce a minimum of 30 pages of reviewed and edited writing, including at least 20 pages of instructor-assessed writing.

FDMAT 108 Mathematical Tools for the Real World

1.      Make sound financial decisions through careful budgeting, provident living, taking advantage of the power of compound interest, and prudently managing debt and tax obligations.

2.      Develop critical thinking and problem solving skills to make informed decisions with confidence.

3.      Apply properties of arithmetic and algebra in the use of percentages, unit conversions, and linear and exponential models, to solve practical problems.

4.      Use fundamental principles of probability, along with descriptive and inferential statistics, to better scrutinize statistical studies discussed in the media.

5.      Appreciate the aesthetic value of mathematics by reading and writing about enrichment topics such as the golden ratio, mathematics & music, the pigeonhole principle, or the concept of infinity.

FDSCI 101 Science Foundations

1.      Explain the complementary natures of scientific and religious inquiry.

2.      Be able to identify and reconcile apparent conflicts.

3.      Describe the process of science and apply it to a variety of disciplines.

4.      Demonstrate how exploration & discovery, testing ideas, community analysis & feedback, and consideration of benefits & outcomes contribute to the development of scientific knowledge and theories.

5.      Illustrate the process of science in the development of major theories in various disciplines, including cosmology, chemistry, geology, and disciplines.

6.      Apply science personally and generally to their daily life.

7.      Evaluate the validity of scientific claims

8.      Become excited about science and appreciate its usefulness.

9.      Show an increased positive attitude towards science and scientists.

10.  Recognize positive contributions science makes to society.

 

FDSCI 200 Energy in the 21st Century

1.      Demonstrate an understanding of the scientific principles and technical issues relating to energy production and use, including fossil-fuel-based and renewable technologies.

2.      Demonstrate quantitative reasoning skills in the context of energy.

3.      Identify personal choices that will conserve energy and/or save money.

4.      Demonstrate skills in critical thinking and communication.

FDSCI 201 Natural Disasters: Man & the Dynamic Earth

1.      The study of natural disasters provides an excellent platform from which to study interdisciplinary issues involving a broad array of disciplines geology, history, geography, economics, the arts, and political science in a team and case studies environment.

2.      Student competencies will be developed in knowledge acquisition, knowledge dissemination, critical thinking, mathematical reasoning, scientific literacy, spiritual and social well-being, and citizenship.

3.      Economics and Engineering: As populations and affluence increase, more people and infrastructure are moving into areas prone to natural hazards and are suffering the human and economic costs.

4.      Political Science and History: Geologic events have influenced and continue to influence the lives of people in civilizations including the Minoans, Romans, ancient Americans, the Middle East, and the United States.

5.      The Arts: Natural features, materials, and events have influenced the development and content of art, architecture, and literature. Examples are clothing and climate as reflected in paintings done during the Little Ice Age, and Mary Shelley's writing of Frankenstein during the year without a summer.

6.      Geography: The current positions of the tectonic plates on Earth's surface and the nature of interactions between those plates shape the geography of Earth and dictate the distribution of natural resources, thereby strongly influencing the economics and politics of today's world.

FDSCI 202 Issues in Global Climate Change

1.      The purpose of this course is to help develop the ability to productively participate in the discussion surrounding modern global climate change. Specifically, after completing this class, students will be able to:

2.      Describe the process, power, and limitations of scientific inquiry.

3.      Explain why we have confidence in science and demonstrate how to distinguish credible science in the face of personal bias.

4.      List observations showing that global climate is changing.

5.      Identify basic physical principles and components of climate independent of human involvement.

6.      Explain the contributions of human activities to climate change.

7.      Describe projected effects of ongoing climate change.

8.      Suggest actions that can be taken locally and globally to mitigate our impact on climate.

9.      Demonstrate basic knowledge of the way in which science, engineering, society, and policy interact.

10.  Gain first-hand experience with climate change science and climate-related policy decisions.

 

FDSCI 203 Environmental Stewardship

1.      Describe environmental issues in view of their multi-dimensional, complex, and dynamic natures.  (i.e., What is the problem?)

2.      Identify the biases that can affect our perspective (this may include personal preferences, individual beliefs, social mores, religious standards, education level, world opinions, economic factors, political agendas, etc.).
Apply scientific principles and reasoning to critically evaluate the information and data central to an issue.

a.       Evaluate the accuracy and judge the merits of the information provided.
Identify and separate the issue from the emotion.

3.      Identify my role in a particular environmental issue and my responsibility to environmental quality. (i.e., How am I involved?  How does it affect me?)

4.      Calculate the extent of my ecological footprint by identifying required or desired resources.
Determine my contribution (both positive and negative) to environmental quality through personal choices.
Compare my resource requirement to that of others, or contrast global resource availability with global standard-of-living levels. (I need help wording this outcome. The idea is to have the student understand that resource usage is not uniform for humankind, and how much of a global resource would be required if everyone used that resource at the student's current usage or standard-of-living.)

5.      Explore reasonable solutions to diminish or resolve environmental concerns, both locally and globally.  (i.e., what can I do?)

a.       Outline the extent that current science and technology may be applied.
Identify potential risks and benefits to any proposed solutions, at various scales (i.e., locally, regionally, or globally).
Develop a personal plan of action.

b.      Seek understanding and guidance through study and prayer

c.       Identify any moral or ethical obligations to help or bless others.
Consider what the potential consequences of any action or inaction might be.
Act appropriately without violating local, state, national, and/or international law.

 

FDSCI 204 The American Epidemic: Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease

1.      Assess their personal cardiovascular fitness level.

2.      Understand what wellness means and explore ways to improve overall wellness. Students will understand what good nutrition is and analyze their current nutritional intake.

3.      Study the basic foundations of chemistry, cell biology and physiology to understand the causes, manifestations and complications of diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

4.      Understand the risk factors for developing the conditions discussed in this course.

 

FDSCI 205 DNA: Identity, Disease, Design

After completing this course students will:

1.      Identify the role of DNA in humans and its application in modern Biotechnology issues.

2.      Explain DNA's role in the complexity of life processes, the variation among God's children, and the uniqueness of the individual.

3.      Articulate opposing views on scientific issues and show how evidence supports or refutes a conclusion.

4.      Integrate gospel perspectives with science in evaluating biological issues.

5.      Find and evaluate scientific resources.

6.      Become informed and involved citizens.

FDSCI 206 Light and Sound: The science of Vision & Hearing

Successful students will gain the following understanding:

1.      How persuaders use rational and emotional messages through Light and Sound in political, ideological, and commercial messages.

2.      The physical nature of light and sound.

3.      How the body and mind detect and interpret light and sound.

4.      How the mind's perception of our senses of light and sound can be fooled.

Successful student will become:

1.      Better citizens and more savvy consumers.

2.      More aware and feel greater appreciation of the beauty and complexity of the world around them, and become more curious about it.

3.      More confident in using the process of science to understand their world.

4.      More confident in their testimonies of the restored gospel.

Successful students will be able to:

1.      Recognize and account for the influence of advertising when making decisions.

2.      Analyze a news report and its use of light and sound to persuade and manipulate.

3.      Make informed choices about the entertainment they and their families consume.

4.      Apply scientific thinking methods in work place and home.

 

FDSCI 208 Introduction to Robotics

1.      Understand and apply fundamentals of problem solving, design, and analysis as used in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) disciplines.

2.      Demonstrate an understanding of basic principles in designing and building robots including the use of sensors, actuators, controllers, and mechanical structures.

3.      Demonstrate an understanding of simple machines and mechanisms used in robotics, such as gears, pulleys, levers, belts and wheels.

4.      Demonstrate an understanding of the basic characteristics response of sensors and how to interface them.

5.      Understand the principles of transducing signals and the basic physical or chemical principles used for transducing

6.      Understand the three basic components of a sensor

7.      Understand the response, resolution, and sensitivity of a sensor

8.      Be able to use the sensors provided in the LEGO kits

9.      Understand the systematic, random, and aliasing errors inherent in using sensors

10.  Understand how to reduce sensor error through calibration and be able to calibrate a sensor

11.  Demonstrate an understanding of actuator usage to convert energy to simple linear or rotary motion.

12.  Know how electric motors work.

13.  Be familiar with other types of actuators (hydraulic, pneumatic).

14.  Understand how external combustion engines (steam) and internal combustion engines (gasoline or diesel) work.

15.  Power transmission

16.  Demonstrate the ability to program a basic robot controller (e.g. the Lego NXT controller).

17.  Computer viruses

18.  Basics of programming the Lego controller

19.  History of programming

20.  Understand moral and ethical issues relating to robotics and automation.

21.  Develop and demonstrate effective teamwork skills.

 

FDSCI 209 How to build a Habitable Planet

1.      Articulate the relationship between observation and interpretation; form and defend interpretations based on observations.

2.      Describe their understanding and appreciation of the strengths and limitations of science as a method for discovering truth.

3.      Express the relationship between discovered and revealed truth; apply both sources of truth to address questions that lie at the science-religion interface.

4.      Explain the principles that govern the formation, development, and maintenance of habitable worlds.

5.      Demonstrate a sense of curiosity and awe about the Creation.

 

FDSCI 210 Neanderthals and Other Successes

1.      After taking this course, you should be able to intelligently discuss the scientific underpinnings of life from the perspective of modern science. Moreover, you should better understand the assumptions, purposes, strengths, and limitations of science and the importance of considering the biosphere from philosophical and religious perspective as well for a complete understanding of life. Not only will the fulfillment of these goals enrich your lives, this course should better prepare you to share the gospel with science-minded investigators. Additionally, we hope that you will:

2.      Generate greater understanding and appreciation of science as a method for discovering truth (and its limits), and especially the origin, mechanics, and evolution of the biosphere.

3.      Discover general scientific principles that govern the rise and demise of species, ecosystems, and, human civilizations

4.      Develop greater ability to observe physical details in the world around us (learn to see), think creatively and critically (learn to interpret what we see), and formulate scientific questions (and testable hypotheses)

5.      Develop a greater understanding of the events that must have taken place during the history of the earth to sustain humans and our civilizations.

6.      Intelligently defend why you believe what you believe, and make informed decisions about science and society.

7.      Build a lifelong sense of curiosity and desire to learn.

 

FDSCI299L Topics in Life Sciences

Outcomes will vary with the topic.

 

FDSCI299P Topics in Physical Sciences

Outcomes will vary with the topic.

 

FDSCI299S Topics in Social Sciences

Outcomes will vary with the topic.

 

FDWLD 101 World Foundations I

Knowledge

1.      General and specific understanding of various Redemption Patterns and Moral Truths

2.      Understand historical contributions up to the 15th Century (history as context for our lives)

3.      Understand relationship of civilization (just society) to Redemption (Religious ritual and myth)

4.      Contextualized historical overview of several civilizations

5.      Appropriately evaluate the ways in which a civilization's art, architecture, music, drama, and literature reveal its values, redemptive rituals, moral truth, and concepts of social justice

Attitudes / Values

1.      Increased willingness to look for and acknowledge moral truths found in other cultural and religious traditions.

2.      Increased awareness of self as a learner applying tools and applying articulated processes to the business of learning

3.      Willingness to engage other cultures or traditions with a conscious attempt to manage biases and prejudices inherent in one's own culture

4.      Greater appreciation that the Gospel encompasses all truth

5.      Demonstrably increased ability to evaluate cultures, literatures, music, arts, philosophies and religions to better understand different cultures, traditions and perspectives

6.      An increased ability to 'see through the eyes of another' who is very different from oneself

 

FDWLD 201 World Foundations II

Knowledge

1.      General and specific understanding of various Redemption Patterns and Moral Truths

2.      Understand historical contributions from 15th century to modernity (history as context for our lives)

3.      Understand relationship of civilization (just society) to Redemption (Religious ritual and myth)

4.      Contextualized historical overview of several civilizations

5.      Appropriately evaluate the ways in which a civilization's art, architecture, music, drama, and literature reveal its values, redemptive rituals, moral truths, and concepts of social justice

Attitudes / Values

1.      Increased willingness to look for and acknowledge moral truths found in other cultural and religious traditions.

2.      Increased awareness of self as a learner applying tools and applying articulated processes to the business of learning

3.      Willingness to engage other cultures or traditions with a conscious attempt to manage biases and prejudices inherent in one's own culture

4.      Greater appreciation that the Gospel encompasses all truth

5.      Demonstrably increased ability to evaluate cultures, literatures, music, arts, philosophies and religions to better understand different cultures, traditions and perspectives

6.      An increased ability to 'see through the eyes of another' who is very different from oneself