Course Outcomes

CHEM 101 -Introduction to General Chemistry
1. Explain the behavior of, and interactions between, matter and energy at both the atomic and molecular levels.
2. Use standardized names and symbols to represent atoms, molecules, ions and chemical
reactions.
3. Predict atomic structure, chemical bonding or molecular geometry based on accepted
models.
4. Apply quantitative reasoning skills to matter and energy, and physical or chemical
changes that occur.
5. Use accepted models to describe the reactions between acids and basis and basic
equilibrium concepts
6. Demonstrate competence in collecting and interpreting data in the laboratory.

Chem. 101 Lab -Introduction to General Chemistry Lab
1. Define chemistry as the study of the composition, structure, properties, and reactions of matter.
2. Identify methods and instruments that can be used to study chemistry.
3. Evaluate data generated by experimental methods for chemical characterization.
4. Apply quantitative reasoning skills to determine quantities of matter and energy involved in physical and chemical changes.

CHEM 105 -General Chemistry I
1. Explain the behavior of, and interactions between, matter and energy at the atomic and molecular levels.
2. Use standardized names and symbols to represent atoms, molecules, ions and chemical reactions.
3. Predict atomic structure, chemical bonding or molecular geometry based on accepted models.
4. Apply quantitative reasoning skills to determine quantities of matter and energy involved in physical and chemical changes.
5. Demonstrate competence in collecting and interpreting data in the laboratory.

CHEM 106 -General Chemistry II
1. Explain the behavior of, and interactions between, matter and energy at the atomic and molecular levels.
2. Understand the principles of kinetics and thermodynamics as applied to rates and equilibrium positions of chemical reactions.
3. Use quantitative measures of solution concentration in describing colligative, acid-base, solubility, and electrochemical principles of aqueous solutions.
4. Interpret nuclear processes such as radioactivity, fission, and fusion in terms of kinetic and thermodynamic principles.
5. Demonstrate competency in collecting, interpreting, and reporting data in the laboratory.

CHEM 150 -Introductory Organic and Biochemistry
1. Identify the physical and chemical properties of common organic functional groups.
2. Recognize the structure and function of carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, proteins, nucleotides, and nucleic acids.
3. Know the reactions of the major catabolic and anabolic pathways of carbohydrate, lipid, and amino acid metabolism.
4. Understand the signaling pathways of epinephrine, glucagon, and insulin.

CHEM 153 -Introductory Organic and Biochemistry Lab
1. Follow safety procedures and demonstrate proper use of personal protective equipment.
2. Demonstrate laboratory techniques that relate to investigations of the physical or chemical properties of different classes of molecules.
3. Apply principles of chemistry to the observations of substances experiencing physical or chemical changes.

CHEM. 220 -Quantitative Analysis
For the topics solutions, laboratory concepts, experimental error, statistics and calibration curves, quality assurance, complex chemical equilibria and activities, acids and bases, titrations, electrochemistry, spectroscopy, and extraction and chromatography there will be demonstration of an intermediate competence in the following areas:
1. Conceptual understanding for the purpose of problem solving, predicting outcomes, explaining phenomena, and describing relationships.
2. Quantitative reasoning for the purpose of calculating numerical values associated with problem solving, predicting outcomes, explaining phenomena, and describing relationships.
3. Laboratory skills for the purpose of collecting, interpreting, analyzing, and reporting (in written form) chemical data.

BIO (CHEM/PHY/GEOL) 305 - Science Teaching Principles
1. Students will understand and be able to explain the rationale for teaching science in public education and the differences between science and "non-science".
2. Students will be able to identify and explain strategies for best teaching practices, teaching for understanding, classroom management, effective assessment, and how to improve literacy specific to learning in a science education environment.
3. Students will be able to create and teach lessons that incorporate best practices for science teaching and that are consistent with the goals and recommendations of the Common Core State Standards and the Next Generation Science Standards.
4. Students will begin to understand the field of public education through observation and working with public teachers, administrators, and students.

CHEM. 351 -Organic I
1. Predict the major and minor products of a variety of organic reactions with appropriate stereochemistry and regiochemistry.
2. Understand and reproduce accepted mechanisms of organic reactions including all intermediates, arrows, charges, and resonance structures.
3. Understand and interpret spectra (IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, Mass Spec., and UV-VIS) of organic molecules.
4. Name or draw the structure of an organic molecule using substitutive and/or functional class IUPAC nomenclature.
5. Devise reasonable high-yield synthesis of a target molecule from given organic starting materials.
6. Understand physical properties of organic molecules.
7. Perform a laboratory experiment using conventional equipment, instrumentation, and techniques and understand the principles well enough to interpret the data collected.

CHEM 352 -Organic II
1. Predict the major and minor products of a variety of organic reactions with appropriate stereochemistry and regiochemistry.
2. Understand and reproduce accepted mechanisms of organic reactions including all intermediates, arrows, charges, and resonance structures.
3. Understand and interpret spectra (IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, Mass Spec., and UV-VIS) of organic molecules.
4. Name or draw the structure of an organic molecule using substitutive and/or functional class IUPAC nomenclature.
5. Devise reasonable high-yield synthesis of a target molecule from given organic starting materials.
6. Understand physical properties of organic molecules.
7. Perform a laboratory experiment using conventional equipment, instrumentation, and techniques and understand the principles well enough to interpret the data collected.

CHEM 391 -Tech Writing in Chemical Lit
1. Become familiar with, and learn to effectively use, common electronic resources for searching the scientific literature.
2. Learn to communicate in writing scientific findings in a manner consistent with literature practices. Specifically,
a. Become familiar with the common structure and format of a typical research article in the literature (Abstract, Introduction, Experimental/Methods, Results, Discussion, Summary)
b. Learn to write in a style consistent with that found in the literature.
c. Learn to properly incorporate tables and figures into a research article.
d. Properly cite references in a research article using accepted literature formats.
3. Learn to adapt a written document for oral presentation. Specifically:
a. Identify similarities and differences in oral vs. written delivery of research material.
b. Learn effective steps for designing visual material (Power Point slides) for use in an oral presentation.
c. Practice public speaking skills needed for oral technical presentations.
4. Learn how the process of peer-review is used in the chemical literature, and practice effective reviewing techniques when reading others' work.
Outcomes:
Each student will write a research article in the style of the chemical literature, using data gathered by the student in a previous research project, or data provided by the instructor. The article will consist of approximately 15-20 pages of polished prose, not including tables, figures, or references. Assignments for the course will be built around meeting this major outcome.
Each student will also give a ten-minute presentation based on his or her written document. The oral presentation will include an appropriate amount of effective visuals (usually Power Point slides).

BIO (CHEM/PHY/GEOL) 405 - Science Teaching Methods
1. Students will understand and be able to explain the rationale for teaching science in public education and the importance of integrating and understanding the various science fields that are taught in secondary education.
2. Students will be able to identify and demonstrate science teaching methods, classroom management, effective assessment, and how to improve science education literacy through integrating the various fields of science.
3. Students will learn and practice lab safety techniques and receive a certificate from completing a lab safety training program.
4. Students will put theory to practice through developing curricula and other resources (such as labs, demonstrations, simulations, etc.) that will be used in teaching experiences that will occur throughout the semester
5. Students will understand the need for continuing professional development through reflection essays and professional laboratory safety training.

CHEM 420 -Instrumental Analysis
1. In the major areas of spectroscopy, separations, mass spectrometry, and electrochemistry students will be able to:
a. Describe and understand the capabilities and limitations of instrumental methods
b. Explain the instrument components and principles of operation
2. Upon being introduced to the steps of the analytical process, students will be able to correctly select an analytical method and instrument meeting their use objectives.
3. Students will be able to use and interpret electronics, signal/noise ratio, and signal processing as required for chemical analysis.

CHEM. 421 -Instrumental Analysis Lab
1. Gather, interpret, evaluate, and communicate data correctly in writing and/or orally.
2. In the major areas of spectroscopy, separations, mass spectrometry, and electrochemistry students will be able to:
a. Operate common laboratory instruments used for chemical analysis
b. Describe and understand the capabilities and limitations of instrumental methods
c. Explain the instrumental components and principles of operation

CHEM 461 -Physical I
1. Investigate and understand the physical models underlying our current perception of atomic and molecular behavior at the most basic, fundamental level. Understand basic terminology of quantum chemistry and spectroscopy in context of these models.
2. Develop an ability to use conceptual and mathematical tools to express and predict atomic and molecular behavior.
3. Analyze and interpret experimental data using quantum mechanical models.
4. Culture a basic understanding of how computational chemistry can be used to determine atomic and molecular properties.
5. Increase critical reading and critical thinking abilities.
6. Increase an appreciation for the creations of the Lord.

CHEM 462 Physical II
1. Statistical mechanics: Apply probability principles to the behavior of large ensembles of atoms or molecules, and to use this to predict thermodynamic properties of a system.
2. Thermodynamics: Develop a competent knowledge of classical thermodynamic principles, compare these to those from statistical mechanics, and apply them to a variety of phase (gas, liquid, solid, and solution) and reaction equilibria.
3. Examine basic principles of kinetics, and tie thermodynamics and kinetics together through a rudimentary examination of Eyring theory.
4. Analyze and interpret experimental data using these thermodynamic, statistical and kinetic models.
5. Increase critical reading and critical thinking abilities.
6. Increase an appreciation for the creations of the Lord.

CHEM 464 -Physical and Instrumental Lab
1. Become familiar with instrumental analysis techniques in chemistry.
2. Become proficient in data analysis and interpretation.
3. Building on previous coursework (CHEM 391), become proficient in preparing and evaluating scientific reports, proposals, and oral presentations.

CHEM 468 -Physical Biochemistry

1. Understand and describe the relationship between chemistry, physics, and biology
2. Be able to search, read, and understand the applicable primary literature
3. Analyze data and organize information
4. Discuss physical biochemistry research, experiments, and techniques and explain the factors that affect the experimental outcome

CHEM 470 -Inorganic Chemistry
1. Predict physical and electronic properties of atoms using current models and theories in chemistry (emphasis placed on the quantum mechanical model).
2. Apply current chemistry models/theories to understand and predict the physical/electronic properties, bonding, and reactivity that occur in inorganic complexes with emphasis on coordination complexes containing transition metals.
3. Construct qualitative sets of molecular orbitals for simple molecules and inorganic complexes.
4. Describe the physical and electronic properties of solid-state materials and bioinorganic molecules.
5. Develop important process skills which will enhance lifelong learning (POGIL and the Learning Model).
6. By completing this course students will understand the foundational principles and topics relevant to the field of inorganic chemistry. This will aid the program outcomes to prepare students for employment or further educational training.
o Assessment/measurement - Exams, quizzes, and the ACS standardized final.
7. Using concepts and models applicable to inorganic chemistry, students will analyze inorganic systems in a systematic and detailed fashion. Predictions of physical and chemical properties will be based on these analyses.
o Assessment/measurement - Homework and literature assignments, quizzes and exams.
8. As well as learning content, students will also develop (or further develop) important process skills which will enable lifelong learning (POGIL and Learning Model).
o Assessment/measurement - Conceptual gains test, class participation, and others.

CHEM 471 -Advanced Lab
1. Prepare, purify, and characterize inorganic compounds using modern techniques. Types of compounds will include:
o Coordination compounds including organometallic complexes;
o Solid-state compounds; and
o Bioinorganic compounds.
2. Operate modern inorganic instrumentation to characterize synthesized inorganic compounds that include the following:
o Infrared spectroscopy;
o UV-vis spectroscopy;
o NMR spectroscopy; and
o Magnetic susceptibility.
3. Record results of discussion of syntheses in a laboratory notebook using proper record-keeping procedures.

CHEM 481 -Biochemistry I
1. Recognize the structures and functions of biomolecules that form the basis of what we understand to be living organisms.
2. Learn basic principles of structural and functional relationships of biological molecules.
3. Discuss biochemistry research, experiments, and techniques in relationship to biomolecules and structures
4. Be able to search, read, and understand the applicable primary literature
5. Design and propose experimental approaches to solve biochemical questions

CHEM 482 -Biochemistry II
Understand and describe the relationship between chemistry and biology in metabolic pathways
1. Rationalize the transfer of energy in living systems on the molecular level.
2. Discuss biochemistry research, experiments, and techniques in relationship to metabolic reactions
3. Be able to search, read, and understand the applicable primary literature
4. Analyze data and organize biochemical information
5. Design and propose experimental approaches to solve biochemical questions

CHEM 485 - Introduction to Biochemistry Literature
1. Identify journals that publish peer-reviewed literature in the general, biochemical, and topic-specific scientific disciplines.
2. Utilize literature database search engines to find peer-reviewed literature in a specific topic.
3. Recognize the biochemical perspective on current topics in medicine and health science.
4. Develop oral presentation skills.

CHEM 490 -Special Topics in Chemistry
Course description:
This is a course that develops students skills required for entry into specialized sub-disciplines in the chemical industry and chemical research. Different faculty in the department offer courses related to their respective areas of expertise in a rotation basis.
Course outcomes:
1. Students will communicate professionally using the technical vocabulary pertaining to a specialized chemistry sub-discipline.
2. Students will use correctly the standard conceptual and mathematical frameworks of a specialized chemistry sub-discipline to model cases and solve relevant problems.
3. Students will develop criteria to evaluate cases and problems within a specialized chemistry sub-discipline to identify those that warrant further study.
4. Students will propose and carry-out a specific student-selected project within a specialized chemistry sub-discipline.
5. Students will identify and learn to use the primary and secondary literature and other resources available for them to continue their study of a specialized chemistry sub-discipline after they leave the course.
6. Students will make appropriate connections between true scientific principles learned in the course and principles from the restored gospel.

CHEM 492R- Student Research
1. Students in CHEM 492 will become effective scientific professionals by acquiring skills in the following areas:
o Intellectual
2. Develop chemical understanding in a moderately specific area of chemistry beyond the classroom.
o Communication
3. Effectively communicate scientific results at a conference (e.g., Research & Creative Works Conference) or prepare a written report (individual or group) of their semester project.
o Experimental
4. Devise and perform experiments safely, acquire data, and perform data analysis.

CHEM 498 -Chemistry Internship
Gain real-world experience through off-campus, laboratory-based work in a chemistry related field.
Increase exposure to research and development opportunities in chemistry through internship work done outside the normal opportunities available on campus.
Improve scientific communication skills by writing a technical report and delivering an oral

4/2016