Course Descriptions

Chem 101 Chem 101L Chem 105
Chem 106 Chem 150 Chem 153
Chem 220 Chem 351 Chem 352
Chem 391 Chem 405  Chem 420
Chem 421 Chem 461 Chem 462
Chem 464 Chem 468 Chem 470
Chem 471 Chem 481 Chem 482
Chem 485 Chem 490 Chem 492R
Chem 498
Syllabus Info for (CHEM 101) Introductory General Chemistry

Course Department: Chemistry

School Year: 2015-2016

 Course Description

 

This is an introductory course covering basic concepts in general chemistry. The course is designed for students in nursing, home economics, agriculture, biology, and other areas that require a broad introduction to general and inorganic chemistry. This course serves as a preparation for CHEM 150.

 Content and Topics

 

Matter, energy, measurement, conversions of units, atoms, the periodic table, ionic and molecular compounds, shapes of molecules, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, gas laws, solutions, reaction rates, equilibrium, acids and bases, and basic chemistry laboratory techniques.

 Goals and Objectives

 

Explore the role of measurements in understanding and quantifying principles of chemistry.

Understand the structure of matter on atomic and molecular levels and its correlation to chemical and physical properties.

Comprehend quantitative relationships in chemical equations.

Identify types of chemical reactions.

Understand the energetics and kinetics of chemical reactions.

Characterize the differences in the states of matter and the unique properties associated with each.

 Course Requirements

 

Varies by instructor, generally there are quizzes and exams.  If Chem. 101 Lab is required it should be taken concurrently.

 Semesters Taught

 

Winter Spring Fall

Online course available
Separate online lab is offered

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Syllabus Info for (CHEM 101L) Intro General Chemistry Lab

Course Department: Chemistry

School Year: 2015-2016

 Course Description

 

This course is an online introduction to chemistry lab that illustrates principles of chemistry and laboratory techniques. Participation in the course requires reading pre-lab materials, completion of a pre-lab quiz, watching videos demonstrating laboratory procedures, recording data and observations in electronic format, and completing a post-lab quiz.

 Content and Topics

 

Scientific Measurements, Density, Physical Properties, Heat and Temperature, Light and Matter, Moles and Stoichiometry, Chemical Reactions, Gas Laws, Rates of Reaction, Titration.

 Goals and Objectives

 

1.  Observe laboratory techniques and understand their usefulness in providing data for problem solving.
2. Record measurements from scientific instruments with correct precision. 
3.  Perform calculations and solve problems using data collected from laboratory measurements. 
4.  Use computer software to present experimental data in graphs for the interpretation of experimentally acquired data.

 Course Requirements

 

1. Computer with high speed internet access. 
2. Spreadsheet software (Microsoft Excel or equivalent). 
3. Completion or concurrent enrollment in Chemistry 101 is required. It is strongly recommended that this course is taken concurrently with Chemistry 101.

 Semesters Taught

 

Winter Spring Fall

Prerequisites Completion of or concurrent enrollment in Chem 101.
Separate classroom lecture is offered

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Syllabus Info for (CHEM 105) General Chemistry I

Course Department: Chemistry

School Year: 2015-2016

 Course Description

 

This is the first semester of a two-semester course designed to meet the general chemistry requirements in engineering, science, and pre-professional majors. This course includes a lecture and laboratory experience.

 Content and Topics

 

Physical and chemical changes, scientific method, uncertainty in measurements, energy transformations, stoichiometry, types of chemical reactions, naming compounds, thermochemistry, electrolytes and solution properties, atomic structure, bonding, molecular geometry, states of matter, gas laws, and intermolecular forces. The laboratory component of the course teaches standard laboratory techniques and emphasizes the role quantitative measurements play in extracting chemically useful information.

 Goals and Objectives

 

Recognize and distinguish between physical and chemical change.

Understand the scientific method.

Demonstrate appropriate use of numbers related to uncertainty in measurements.

Apply stoichiometry in determining quantity relationships for compounds and chemical reactions.

Write chemical equations and classify chemical reactions.

Name ionic and covalent compounds.

Know the properties of acids and bases.

Identify aspects of atomic structure.

Describe bonding theories and recognize molecular geometry.

Describe states of matter, including changes of state.

Perform calculations with gas laws.

Recognize different types of intermolecular forces.

Calculate energy changes associated with chemical processes.

 Course Requirements

 

Varies with instructor. Typically there are 5 exams, 10 quizzes, and 10 lab experiments. Some sections may require writing or Internet assignments.

 Semesters Taught

 

Winter Spring Fall


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Syllabus Info for (CHEM 106) General Chemistry II

Course Department: Chemistry

School Year: 2015-2016

 Course Description

 

This is the second semester of a two-semester course designed to meet the general chemistry requirements in engineering, science, and pre-professional majors. This course includes a lecture and laboratory experience.

 Content and Topics

 

Colligative properties, chemical thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, general chemical equilibria, properties of acids and bases, acid and base equilibria, pH, buffers, ionic compound solubility and nuclear chemistry nomenclature . The laboratory component of the course teaches standard laboratory techniques and emphasizes the role quantitative measurements play in extracting chemically useful information. The laboratory component also reinforces the equilibria concepts through the application of these principles in the qualitative analysis of cations and anions.

 Goals and Objectives

 

Understand the laws of thermodynamics and calculate the change in values of state functions for various physical and chemical processes.

Identify and calculate mathematical descriptions of the kinetics of chemical processes.

Demonstrate an understanding of chemical equilibrium and calculate solutions for equilibrium expressions.

Demonstrate an understanding of acid-base equilibrium by calculating resulting values in pH and reactant/product concentrations for acid-base processes such as buffer solutions and titrations.

Using concepts from solubility equilibria, calculate solution concentrations from solubility-product expressions and compound solubility.

Identify the basic concepts of electrochemistry and calculate voltages and the concentrations of species in electrochemical cells.

Write mathematical representations for nuclear processes and predict products as nuclear processes take place.

Perform calculations with colligative properties equations.

 Course Requirements

 

Varies with instructor. Typically there are 5 exams, 10 quizzes, and 10 lab experiments. Some sections may require writing or Internet assignments.

 Semesters Taught

 

Winter Spring Fall


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Syllabus Info for (CHEM 150) Intro Organic and Biochemistry

Course Department: Chemistry

School Year: 2015-2016

 Course Description

 

This course is a one-semester introduction to organic and biochemistry that is a continuation of Chemistry 101 and is designed for students pursuing degrees or advanced training in nursing, dental hygiene, exercise and sports science, or health science. Students who also need an organic and biochemistry laboratory should concurrently register for Chemistry 153. This course is not preparatory for advanced organic and biochemistry courses.

 Content and Topics

 

Topics include the structure and reactions of common organic functional groups with significant emphasis on the biochemical context of the chemical properties of organic molecules. The structure and function of carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, proteins, nucleotides, and nucleic acids is also covered.  Significant emphasis is given to the major catabolic and anabolic pathways of carbohydrate, lipid, and amino acid metabolism

 Goals and Objectives

 

Identify the physical and chemical properties of common functional groups.

Understand the structure and function of carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, proteins, nucleotides, and nucleic acids.

Know the reactions of the major catabolic and anabolic pathways of carbohydrate, lipid, and amino acid metabolism

 Course Requirements

 

Completion of Chemistry 101 or Chemistry 105 with a grade of C- or higher.

 Semesters Taught

 

Winter Spring


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Syllabus Info for (CHEM 153) Intro Organic & Biochemistry Lab

Course Department: Chemistry

School Year: 2015-2016

 Course Description

 

This course is a laboratory experience that provides an introduction to basic techniques in organic chemistry and introduces the physical and chemical properties of some organic molecules.

 Content and Topics

 

The following techniques are part of the laboratory experience: recrystallization, steam distillation, thin layer chromatography, solvent extraction, and elementary organic synthesis. Additional experiments explore the physical and chemical properties of carbohydrates, amino acids, and nucleic acids.

 Goals and Objectives

 

1.  Demonstrate proficiency in the following laboratory techniques: recrystallization, steam distillation, thin layer chromatography, solvent extraction, and elementary organic synthesis.

2.  Discover principles relating to the physical and chemical properties of organic molecules.

 Course Requirements

 

This lab must be taken concurrently with Chemistry 150.

 Semesters Taught

 

Winter Spring


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Syllabus Info for (CHEM 220) Quantitative Analysis

Course Department: Chemistry

School Year: 2015-2016

 Course Description

 

This is a one-semester course that introduces quantitative analytical techniques, instrumental analysis, and associated chemical principles. This course includes a lecture and laboratory experience.

 Content and Topics

 

Lecture topics include error analysis and statistical treatment of experimental data; sampling and analysis techniques; chemical equilibrium topics applied to chemical analysis; and selected topics in instrumental analysis, including electrochemistry, spectrophotometry, and chromatography. The laboratory emphasizes accuracy and precision in measurement; wet chemistry techniques such as titration and gravimetric analysis; and selected instrumental methods of analysis.

 Goals and Objectives

 

1.  Interpret and evaluate data employing statistical and error analysis methods. 
2.  Understand solution chemistry, including chemical equilibria, complex equilibria, activities, polyfunctional acids/bases, and complexation reactions.
3.  Explain common instrumental theories, practices, characteristics, and techniques (i.e., electrochemistry, spectrophotometer, and chromatography). 
4.   Correctly preform essential laboratory techniques and utilize conventional chemical instrumentation. 
5.   Develop meticulous data gathering and recording practices.

 Course Requirements

 

Four semester exams, one final comprehensive ACS exam, homework assignments, eight laboratories, and a notebook grade. Three lecture hours and six laboratory hours per week. Approximately one third of grade based on laboratory performance.  Chem. 106 is a prerequisite for this course.

 Semesters Taught

 

Spring Fall


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Syllabus Info for (CHEM 351) Organic Chemistry I

Course Department: Chemistry

School Year: 2015-2016

 Course Description

 

The first semester of a year-long course that studies the principles and theories of organic chemistry including the properties, preparation, and reactions of organic compounds. The course is designed for students in Chemistry, Chemical Engineering, Pre-medicine, Pre-dentistry, Pre-pharmacy, Pre-veterinary, and Biology. This course includes a lecture and laboratory experience.

 Content and Topics

 

Chemical Bonding; Alkanes; Conformations of Alkanes and Cycloalkanes; Alcohols and Alkyl Halides; Structure and Preparation of Alkenes: Elimination Reactions; Reactions of Alkenes: Addition Reactions; Stereochemistry; Nucleophilic Substitution; Alkynes; Conjugation in Alkadienes and Allylic Systems; Spectroscopy.
The class also includes laboratory experience. Laboratory experiments are IR Spectroscopy; Distillation; Chemical Kinetics; Extraction; Recrystallization; GC Chromatography; Thin Layer Chromatography; Column Chromatography; Benzylic Bromination; and NMR Spectroscopy.



 Goals and Objectives

 

Prepare for professional exams.

Have the opportunity to learn and understand the theories, properties, and reactions of organic compounds.

Have the opportunity to develop scientific reasoning and perform lab techniques.

 Course Requirements

 

Varies with instructor. Generally the grades are based on about 10 quizzes, 10 labs, and 5-6 exams that are administered throughout the semester. Some classes may require writing assignments or possibly internet assignments. There will also be an American Chemical Society final.

 Semesters Taught

 

Winter Spring Fall


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Syllabus Info for (CHEM 352) Organic Chemistry II

Course Department: Chemistry

School Year: 2015-2016

 Course Description

 

The second semester of a year-long course presenting the principles and theories of organic chemistry including the properties, preparation and reactions of organic compounds. The course is designed for students in Chemistry, Chemical Engineering, Pre-medicine, Pre-dentistry, Pre-veterinary and Biology. This course includes a lecture and laboratory experience.

 Content and Topics

 

Reactions of Arenes; Organometallic Compounds; Alcohols, Diols and Thiols; Ethers, Epoxides and Sulfides; Aldehydes and Ketones; Enols and Enolates; Carboxylic Acids, Carboxylic Acid Derivatives, Ester Enolates; Amines; Arenes and Aromaticity. 

The class includes a laboratory experience.  Laboratory experiments are Friedel-Crafts Acylation, Grignard Reaction, Esterification and Sequential Synthesis (4 steps).

The sequential synthesis varies from semester to semester.

 Goals and Objectives

 

Prepare for professional exams.

Have the opportunity to learn and understand the theories, properties, and reactions of organic compounds.

Have the opportunity to develop scientific reasoning and perform lab techniques.

 Course Requirements

 

Varies with instructor. Generally the grades are based on about 10 quizzes, 5-6 exams, 10 labs, and laboratory essays that are administered throughout the semester. Some classes may require writing assignments or possibly internet assignments. There will also be an American Chemical Society final.

 Semesters Taught

 

Winter Spring Fall


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Syllabus Info for (CHEM 391) Tech Writing in Chemical Lit

Course Department: Chemistry

School Year: 2015-2016

 Course Description

 

This course provides instruction and experience in advanced writing techniques for students planning careers in chemistry or related scientific disciplines. The course will help students: 1) Prepare for further chemistry courses that require scientific writing as a part of their curriculum. 2) Search the chemical literature using relevant database tools. 3) Develop practical experience in writing for a professional, technical audience. 4) Become more effective written communicators in their future scientific careers. This course is a prerequisite for: CHEM 220, CHEM 464, and CHEM 471.

 Content and Topics

 

Searching chemical literature, writing a journal article in the proper style, scientific oral/poster presentations, business communication (resumes, cover letters).



 Goals and Objectives

 

1.  Become familiar with, and learn to effectively use common electronic resources for searching the scientific literature.
2.  Learn to communicate scientific findings in a manner consistent with chemical literature practices.  Specifically, 
        a.  Become familiar with the common structure of a typical research article in the literature (Abstract, Introduction, Experimental/Methods, Results, Discussion, Summary)          b.  Learn writing styles appropriate for the literature. Learn to properly incorporate tables and figures into a research article.
        c.  Properly cite references in a research article using accepted literature formats.
3.  Learn how the process of peer-review is used in the chemical literature, and practice effective reviewing techniques when reading others' work.

 Course Requirements

 

Each student will write a research article in the style of the chemical literature, using data gathered by the student in a previous research project, data provided by the instructor, or acquired from an independent project in your kitchen.  The article will consist of approximately 10-15 pages of polished prose, not including tables, figures, or references.  Assignments for the course will be built around meeting this major outcome. 

Prerequisites:  CHEM 106, FDENG 201.  CHEM 351 recommended.

 Semesters Taught

 

Winter Fall


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Syllabus Info for (CHEM 405) Chemistry Teaching Methods

Course Department: Chemistry

School Year: 2015-2016

 Course Description

 

This course will focus heavily on preparing students to be competent in laboratory procedures, including lab safety issues. Students will learn how to set up labs, order supplies, and prepare and design laboratory experiments in the sciences. In addition, students will become familiar with how demonstrations can be effectively used in the classroom. Ample opportunity will be given to each student to practice the skills needed to effectively teach chemistry in the secondary schools. Students will become familiar with and learn to apply the national and state science and chemistry standards for teaching chemistry at the secondary level.

 Content and Topics

 

Laboratory safety, National Science Standards, effective demonstrations, chemical literature for high school chemistry, history of science, use of simulations and games, use of computers in laboratories, microscale chemistry, concept mapping, using everyday materials to teach chemical principles.

 Goals and Objectives

 

Design a safe, cost effective laboratory/demonstration program that helps to make more tangible the abstract concepts in chemistry.

Incorporate instrumentation, spreadsheets, computer simulations, games and technology into classroom presentations.

Appreciate the scientific method, the limitation of science, and the evolutionary nature of chemistry concepts.

Demonstrate the ability to effectively perform demonstrations.

Analyze and structure chemical concepts so that the sequential presentation of ideas is done in an order that will facilitate meaningful learning.

Explore chemical literature appropriate to the high school setting.

Know and demonstrate proper use and disposal of chemicals and improve safety.

Learn practical laboratory tips that reduce waste, save time, and improve safety.

Review the topics that are to be covered in a high school program and verify mastery of those concepts at least at the level they will be taught.

 Course Requirements

 

Attendance 10%, class assignments 30%, Portfolio 40%, exams 20%.

 Semesters Taught

 

Fall


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Syllabus Info for (CHEM 420) Instrumental Analysis

Course Department: Chemistry

School Year: 2015-2016

 Course Description

 

This is a second semester analytical chemistry course building upon, and reinforcing, principles and concepts introduced in CHEM 220 Quantitative Analysis (e.g., the analytical process, data collection, and data analysis). Emphasis will be placed on the theories and applications of modern chemical instrumentation. The correct use and selection of chemical instrumentation for the purpose of solving chemical problems will be investigated.

 Content and Topics

 

Siynal and noise, spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, voltamerty, chromatography, and electrophoresis.

 Goals and Objectives

 

1.  In the major areas of spectroscopy, separations, mass spectrometry, and electrochemistry students will be able to:
        a. Describe and understand the capabilities and limitations of instrumental methods          
         b.  Explain the instrument components and principles of operation. 

2.  Upon being introduced to the steps of the analytical process, students will be able to correctly select an analytical method and instrument meeting their use objectives.

3.  Students will be able to use and interpret electronics, signal-to-noise ratio, and signal processing as required for chemical analysis

 Course Requirements

 

Successful completion of CHEM 220, CHEM 352, and PH 250 with a C- or better, and concurrent enrollment in CHEM 421.

 Semesters Taught

 

Fall

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Syllabus Info for (CHEM 421) Instrumental Analysis Lab

Course Department: Chemistry

School Year: 2015-2016

 Course Description

 

This course will serve as the accompanying lab to Instrumental Analysis (CHEM 420). Students will gain hands-on experience using a selection of instruments to solve chemical problems. Laboratory experiments will include the use of the following: flame atomic absorption spectrometer, ultraviolet/visible light spectrophotometer, spectrofluorometer, Fourier transform infrared spectrometer, gas chromatograph mass spectrometer, liquid chromatograph, capillary electrophoresis instrument, and a potentiostat.

 Content and Topics

 

Experiment 1: Copper in Tap Water Using Flame Atomic Absorption
Experiment 2: Analysis of a Mixture Using Ultraviolet/Visible Light Spectrophotometry Experiment 3: Quantitative Analysis of Xylenes Using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy
Experiment 4: Analysis of Gasoline Using Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry
Experiment 5: Analysis of Tonic Water Using Spectrofluorometry
Experiment 6: Analysis of an Analgesic Tablet Using High Performance Liquid Chromatography
Experiment 7: Determination of Caffeine in Beverages Using Capillary Electrophoresis
Experiment 8: Cyclic Voltammetry Analysis of Iron
Experiment 9: Nuclear Magnetic Resonance of Ethyl Acetate and Isoamyl Acetate

 Goals and Objectives

 

1.  In the major areas of spectroscopy, separations, mass spectrometry, and electrochemistry students will be able to:
        a.  Operate common laboratory instruments used for chemical analysis.        
        b.   Describe and understand the capabilities and limitations of instrumental methods. 
        c.  Explain the instrumental components and principles of operation. 
2.  Maintain an accurate and complete laboratory notebook. 
3.   Learn how to optimize data collection conditions for various instruments to obtain needed/improved results. 
4.   Gather, interpret, evaluate, and communicate data in writing and orally.

 Course Requirements

 

Successful completion of CHEM 220, CHEM 352, and PH 250 with a C- or better, and concurrent enrollment in CHEM 420

 Semesters Taught

 

Fall

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Syllabus Info for (CHEM 461) Physical Chemistry

Course Department: Chemistry

School Year: 2015-2016

 Course Description

 

This is the first semester of a course covering the fundamental concepts of physical chemistry. This course provides a theoretical and mathematical description of the physical behavior of chemical systems. The first semester covers quantum mechanics and spectroscopy.

 Content and Topics

 

Principles of quantum mechanics, with application to atomic and molecular structure and spectroscopy.

 Goals and Objectives

 

Understanding of the following: Failings of classical physics at the molecular level; wave mechanics and its applications in classical and quantum physics; basic quantum mechanical models (particle in a box, harmonic oscillator, rigid rotor): the hydrogen atom model and applications, atomic structure and spectroscopy, molecular structure and spectroscopy.

 Course Requirements

 

Three unit exams, a final exam, and homework assignments.

 Semesters Taught

 

Fall


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Syllabus Info for (CHEM 462) Physical Chemistry II

Course Department: Chemistry

School Year: 2015-2016

 Course Description

 

This is the second semester of a course covering the fundamental concepts of physical chemistry. This course provides a theoretical and mathematical description of the physical behavior of chemical systems. The second semester covers statistical mechanics, thermodynamics, and kinetics.

 Content and Topics

 

Statistical mechanics, thermodynamics, and kinetic theory.

 Goals and Objectives

 

Know the following: properties of gases, partition functions and the Boltzmann distribution, the laws of thermodynamics and their chemical applications, phase equilibrium and reaction equilibrium, kinetic rate laws and mechanisms. The kinetic theory of gases is covered as time permits.

 Course Requirements

 

Three unit exams, a final exam, and homework assignments.

 Semesters Taught

 

Winter


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Syllabus Info for (CHEM 464) Physical/Instrumental Chem. Lab

Course Department: Chemistry

School Year: 2015-2016

 Course Description

 

In this course, students will gain laboratory experience with modern instrumentation in performing physical and analytical chemistry experiments, and practice scientific writing.

 Content and Topics

 

Physical chemistry experiments covering principles in thermodynamics, kinetics, statistical mechanics and quantum mechanics. Application of a variety of instrumental techniques.

 Goals and Objectives

 

Plan, conduct, and summarize results of laboratory-based scientific inquiries.

Use of instrumentation and computers in data collection and processing.

Practice scientific/technical writing.

 Course Requirements

 

Six laboratory reports in ACS journal format, one poster for a poster session at the end of the semester.

 Semesters Taught

 

Winter


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Syllabus Info for (CHEM 468) Physical Biochemistry

Course Department: Chemistry

School Year: 2015-2016

 Course Description

 

This course will provide an introduction to physical biochemistry through the application of physical laws of the chemistry to biological systems.

 Content and Topics

 

Thermodynamics, equilibrium, kinetics, quantum theory, macromolecular structure and biophysical experimental techniques are among the topics that will be covered.

 Goals and Objectives

 

1.  Understand and describe the relationship between chemistry, physics, and biology.
2.  Be able to search, read, and understand the applicable primary literature.
3.  Analyze data and organize information.
4.  Discuss physical biochemistry research, experiments, and techniques and explain the factors that affect the experimental outcome.

 Course Requirements

 

Completion of Chem 481 and Ph 220 with grades of C- or better.

 Semesters Taught

 

Winter


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Syllabus Info for (CHEM 470) Inorganic Chemistry

Course Department: Chemistry

School Year: 2015-2016

 Course Description

 

This course involves a study of structure, physical and chemical behavior, and bond theory as applied to inorganic chemistry. A variety of inorganic systems will be analyzed in a systematic and detailed fashion through using concepts, models, and experimental data. Underlying trends in both the elements and also their compounds will be explored and identified.

 Content and Topics

 

o Atomic theory and chemical bonding models

o Molecular symmetry involving group theory

o Acid-base concepts

o Solid-state structures and concepts

o Structure, bonding, and reactivity of coordination complexes including organometallic and bioinorganic complexes

o Topics of current interest in inorganic chemistry

 Goals and Objectives

 

Describe the structures, the physical/chemical properties, the bonding behaviors, and the reactivities of inorganic complexes utilizing atomic and bonding theories/models as well as experimental data.

o Describe the physical and electronic properties of atoms and simple molecules using atomic and bonding theories/models.

o Identify symmetries and point groups of inorganic complexes.

o Construct molecular orbitals (MO's) for simple molecules and inorganic complexes using the molecular orbital theory and use these to describe bonding behavior and other properties.

o Describe acid-base chemistry in terms of modern models and concepts.

o Name, draw, and identify isomers of inorganic complexes

o Preform spectral analysis on inorganic complexes using common instrumental techniques.

 Course Requirements

 

o Participation in classroom sessions (3 hours per week)

o Completion of 3 exams which includes one final exam

o Completion of homework as assigned

o Preparation and presentation of a group report on a bioinorganic system

 Semesters Taught

 

Winter


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Syllabus Info for (CHEM 471) Advanced Laboratory

Course Department: Chemistry

School Year: 2015-2016

 Course Description

 

This laboratory course includes exercises in the preparation and purification of inorganic compounds utilizing modern synthetic techniques and equipment. Characterization of inorganic compounds will be performed by modern spectroscopic techniques such as nuclear magnetic resonance, UV-vis, infrared, and magnetic susceptibility.

 Content and Topics

 

Synthesis and characterization of inorganic compounds including organometallic, solid-state, and bioinorganic complexes.



 Goals and Objectives

 

Prepare, purify, and characterize inorganic compounds using modern techniques.  Types of compounds will include:

o Coordination compounds including organometallic complexes;

o Solid-state compounds; and

o Bioinorganic compounds

Operate modern inorganic instrumentation to characterize synthesized inorganic compounds that include the following:

o Infrared spectroscopy;

o UV-vis spectroscopy;

o NMR spectroscopy; and

o Magnetic susceptibility

Record results of discussion of syntheses in a laboratory notebook using proper record-keeping procedures.



 Course Requirements

 

o Synthesize and characterize inorganic compounds in laboratory (6 hours per week).

o Preparation of a laboratory notebook according to specified format.

 Semesters Taught

 

Winter


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Syllabus Info for (CHEM 481) Biochemistry I

Course Department: Chemistry

School Year: 2015-2016

 Course Description

 

The first course in a two-semester series in which students explore the structure and function of proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids. The course is intended for students majoring in chemistry, biochemistry or biology, and those preparing for advanced studies in graduate or professional schools.

 Content and Topics

 

Acid/base chemistry, intermolecular forces, the structure and function of amino acids, proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, nucleotides, and nucleic acids. An introduction to enzyme kinetics and cellular signaling is also included.

 Goals and Objectives

 

1.  Recognize the structures and functions of biomolecules that constitute living organisms. 
2.   Learn basic principles of structural and functional relationships of biological molecules. 
3.  Discuss biochemistry research, experiments, and techniques in relationship to biomolecules. 
4.  Be able to read and understand the applicable primary literature.

 Course Requirements

 

Completion of Chem. 351 with a grade of C- or better.



 Semesters Taught

 

Winter Spring Fall

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Syllabus Info for (CHEM 482) Biochemistry II

Course Department: Chemistry

School Year: 2015-2016

 Course Description

 

The second course in a two-semester series in which students explore the metabolic pathways of carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, and nucleotides. The course is intended for students majoring in chemistry, biochemistry or biology, and those preparing for advanced studies in graduate or professional schools.

 Content and Topics

 

Thermodynamics of biochemical reactions, cellular signaling pathways of insulin, glucagon, and epinephrine, and the metabolic pathways of carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, and nucleotides. Topics relating to the integration and hormonal regulation of metabolism are also discussed.

 Goals and Objectives

 

1.  Understand and describe the relationship between chemistry and biology in metabolic pathways.
2.  Rationalize the transfer of energy in living systems on the molecular leve.l
3.  Discuss biochemistry research, experiments, and techniques in relationship to metabolic reactions.
4.  Be able to read and understand the applicable primary literature.

 Course Requirements

 

Completion of Chem 481 with a grade of C- or better.

 Semesters Taught

 

Winter Spring Fall

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Syllabus Info for (CHEM 485) Intro to Biochemistry Lit

Course Department: Chemistry

School Year: 2015-2016

 Course Description

 

This course is an introduction to literature databases and scholarly articles published in peer-reviewed journals. Students will develop a portfolio and give an oral presentation of their work.

 Content and Topics

 

Literature database searching and writing summary articles of research papers.

 Goals and Objectives

 

1.  Identify journals that publish peer-reviewed literature in the biochemical sciences.
2.  Utilize literature database search engines to find peer-reviewed literature in a specific topic.
3.  Understand the scientific process and experimental design associated with specific articles from the peer-reviewed literature.
4.  Recognize the biochemical perspective on current topics in medicine and health science.
5.  Develop oral presentation skills.

 Course Requirements

 

Completion of Chem 481 with a grade of C- or better.

 Semesters Taught

 

Winter

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Syllabus Info for (CHEM 490) Special Topics in Chemistry

Course Department: Chemistry

School Year: 2015-2016

 Course Description

 

This is a one-semester course emphasizing current topics in chemistry. Each class participant will select a faculty supervisor who will oversee the design and implementation of a curriculum within a specific field of chemistry.

 Content and Topics

 

Will vary according to student and instructor design.

 Goals and Objectives

 

Will vary according to student and instructor design.

 Course Requirements

 

Instructor approval



 Semesters Taught

 

Winter Spring Fall


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Syllabus Info for (CHEM 492R) Student Research

Course Department: Chemistry

School Year: 2015-2016

 Course Description

 

This course is a laboratory and/or field experience in which the student performs meaningful research under the mentorship of a faculty member.

 Content and Topics

 

Content and topics will differ depending on faculty and their research.

As part of the research experience the student will prepare a written report or poster presentation.

 Goals and Objectives

 

Teach skills and give experience in a research environment that will be beneficial for students who continue with graduate school or industrial work.

 Course Requirements

 

Must obtain instructor approval to enroll in this course. 

May be taken for 1 or 2 credits per semester and may be repeated for up to 6 credits.

 Semesters Taught

 

Winter Spring Fall

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Syllabus Info for (CHEM 498) Chemistry Internship

Course Department: Chemistry

School Year: 2015-2016

 Course Description

 

All chemistry majors must find and experience a work internship. This would generally occur the semester after their junior year or during their senior year. The experience could involve working for a government agency, industry, an academic institution, or any organization that employs laboratory chemists on their staff. The credit for the internship would count as the capstone experience required for graduation. The student will have a contract agreement with the employer and be responsible to a faculty supervisor. Upon completion of the internship, a written report and a technical presentation will be made to the BYU-Idaho chemistry department as part of the requirement.

 Content and Topics

 

Scientific experience in a chemistry laboratory in a professional, industrial or academic setting.  Scientific chemistry content varies according to laboratory specifics and student interest.  



 Goals and Objectives

 

Participate in a "real world" laboratory intensive chemistry experience.

Effectively communicate the results of this experience in oral and written form.

 Course Requirements

 

Completion of Chem. 220 Chem. 352, Chem. 462, Chem. 464, or instructor approval.

It is the student's responsibility to find an internship. The internship must then be approved through the internship coordinator in the chemistry department. The student must then complete the internship, prepare a written report and a presentation that will be given to the BYU-I chemistry department.

 Semesters Taught

 

Winter Spring Fall

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